1933 Pierce-Arrow Dash

1933 Pierce-Arrow Dash

1933 Pierce-Arrow Model 836 Club Brougham – Dash. Pierce-Arrow, a highly-respected American luxury automobile in the early decades of the last century, was one of several such makes that went out of business during the Great Depression. The company was bought by Studebaker in 1928 for $5.7 million and was sold in 1933 for $1 million; 1938 was the last year for the make.

This car is displayed in the Pierce-Arrow Foundation Museum at the Gilmore Car Museum at Hickory Corners, Michigan; according to the sign in front of the car, it is one of just 79 Model 836 Broughams produced for 1933. Weighing 4,725 pounds, the Model 836 rides a 136-inch wheelbase and is powered by a six-cylinder engine that produces 135 brake horsepower. When new, the Club Brougham was priced at $2,385, which is equal to about $41,100 in 2011. The car included Pierce-Arrow’s new-for-1933 power-assisted brakes (like … Read More

1981 Austin Allegro 3

1981 Austin Allegro 3

When you think of poor cars and the worst era of British Industry, most will cite the Austin Allegro, a car that truly is a staple of its time, and those times were pretty grim to say the least! It has become a symbol of failure, a monument to catastrophic engineering, a beacon of impracticality and a terrible tribute to an age we Brits would sooner forget.

Bit is the Austin Allegro really deserving of such maligned opinions? Should we really hate it as much as we do?

The story of the Allegro goes back to the previous model of its range, the Austin 1100, a car that had become symbolic of the British family motor industry, with crisp smooth lines, round peeking headlights and a good blend of space and practicality, it sold by the millions and could have almost been described as a family equivalent of the Mini, … Read More