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Worldcars | StroG

 

Tag Archives: worldcars

1973 MG MGB GT

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1973 MG MGB GT

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …

Ford Model T Touring 1914 (8367)

Ford Model T Touring 1914 (8367)

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan – U.S.A.
Type: Model T Touring
Engine: 2896cc straight-4
Power: 22 bhp / 1.600 rpm
Speed: 72 km/h
Production time: 1908 – 1927
Production outlet: 15,458,781
Curb weight: 750 kg

Special:
– On October 1, 1908, the company introduced the successful Ford Model T (also known as Tin Lizzie, Tin Lizzy, T‑Model Ford, Model T, or T), designed by Childe Harold Wills, Joseph A. Galamb and Eugene Farkas,
– At first assembled in Piquette plant and from 1910 in the Highland Park plant.
– It was Fords first mass production car (instead of individual hand crafting). The chassis was drawn by workers on a carriage trough the factory. Later, the sleds were replaced by carts on rails and mechanically drawn ("electric lines").
– This was not the first production line with completely interchangeable parts ever (that was Olds Motor Works, Lansing, Michigan – USA with the Model R Curved Dash), but it was the first time an entire plant worked with this system.
– The bodies were still to 1919 from other manufacturers, notably OJ Beaudette and Kelsey.
– It was Americas first automobile with standard left hand steering, while driving on the right was "the right way".
– The ignition system used an unusual trembler coil system to drive the spark plugs (used only for stationary gas engines) but made the T more flexible to use a range of fuels, like gasoline, kerosene or ethanol.
– The Ts in-line engine was the first engine with a removable cylinder head.
– The transmission is a standard two-speed planetary unit with a magneto located in front of the flywheel. This magneto supplied ignition current generated in a set of stationary coils.
– One had to have special driving techniques in order to keep the planetary gearing under control. So in many States you needed an extra / special driver’s licence.
– The early models had a foot-operated transmission brake and hand-operated rear wheel mechanical drum brakes.
– An option were the "Rocky Mountain Brakes", additional external band brakes only on the rear axle.
– The parking brake works on the tie rods to the drum brakes on the rear axle.
– The suspension employed a transversely mounted semi-elliptical spring for each of the front and rear beam axles which allowed a great deal of wheel movement to cope with the dirt roads of the time.
– The Model T’s built prior to 1919 were supplied with non-demountable wheels. This meant that if a flat tire occurred, the tire had to be removed from the rim and a new tube installed. In 1919, demountable wheels were available which allowed for a spare rim with the tire attached to be carried.
– The wheels were wooden artillery wheels with pneumatic clincher type tires, with steel welded-spoke wheels available in 1926 and 1927.
– Balloon tires with steel wires reinforcing the tire bead became available in 1925.
– Henry Ford: “Any customer can have a car painted any …