1963 Hillman Imp

1963 Hillman Imp

A car who’s name lives in British motoring infamy, a small and subtle little machine that was meant to take on the Mini, but went on to kill the Scottish Motor Industry.

The Hillman Imp was meant to be the company’s great white hope, entering production in 1963 after millions of pounds of investment, including the construction of a new factory at Linwood near Glasgow.

However, Hillman were impatient to get their car into the showrooms, and although there was a huge opening ceremony at the Linwood Factory featuring an appearance by HRH Prince Philip, Hillman had cut some corners. The Prince was only shown certain parts of the factory as most areas had not been finished, and the selection of seven cars he and his entourage were driven round in were in fact the only seven cars that would work properly.

The rest of the cars being produced were tested exhaustively by drivers hired in from the local population, basically driven until the cars wouldn’t run any more, but the distances between breakdowns were very short, some being as low as 30 miles.

Nevertheless the car was produced at the Linwood factory, which employed 6,000 people from one of the most impoverished areas of Scotland. All seemed well, until the sales numbers came in, which showed the initial problems had damaged the car’s reputation and thus resulted in it never selling the the estimated numbers. This was added to by heavy industrial action carried out by the workforce, which resulted in the factory only working at a third the capacity and suffering from many stoppages.

Because of this, the Hillman brand began to suffer, and although cars such as the Avenger, the company folded in 1976, the factory being taken over by Peugeot-Talbot. The factory continued on until 1981 and quickly demolished, resulting in high unemployment that even to this day struggles to recover.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2015-04-27 15:34:53

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , bus , truck , motor , motor vehicle , saloon , estate , compact , sports , roadster , transport , road , heritage , historic , Hillman , Hillman Imp , Imp , worldcars …

Singer 10/26 Roadster 1925 (1849)

Singer 10/26 Roadster 1925 (1849)

Manufacturer: Singer & Co Limited (Singer Motors Limited in 1936), Coventry – UK
Type: 10/26 Roadster
Engine: 1308cc straight-4
Power: 26 bhp / 3.250 rpm
Speed: 72 km/h
Production time: 1924 – 1927
Production outlet: unknown
Curb weight: 830 kg

Special:
– At the time Singer was one of the most prolific manufacturers of motorcars in the UK. By 1928 Singer was Britain’s third largest car maker after Austin and Morris.
– The 10/26 replaced the earlier Singer 10 Model and was fairly advanced for its day. It is easier to drive than many other cars of the time.
– This two-seater with dicky seat has a four-speed manual gearbox + reverse operated by gate change mechanism, a bronze Solex downdraft carburettor, a central throttle pedal, a 12-Volts electric system, odometer, oil pressure gauge, amp meter, electric starter, a 32 liter fuel tank, coil ignition system and rear wheel drive.
– The ladder-frame chassis with steel body has a 90 inch wheelbase, worm & nut steering, original cloth wiring, ROTAX (London) head lights, side lights and switch box, quarter-elliptic leaf spring front suspension, longitudinal semi-elliptic leaf spring rear suspension, standard Dunlop Cord Five Grooved 50X19” tires and mechanical drum brakes all round (1925: the first year that the Singer featured 4-wheel brakes).
– A rear luggage rack, removable side windows/curtains, side mounted spare tires and a 2-gallon "SINGER" petrol can on the running board were optional.
– Both two- and four-seater open top models (Roadster and Tourer) were available, as well as Saloon and Coupé variants.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2015-09-04 08:18:16

Tagged: , Clay , Singer & Co Limited (Singer Motors Limited in 1936), Coventry – UK , 1925 Singer 10/26 Roadster , Singer 10/26 Roadster , cs , British Car , British Convertible , Convertible , AR-50-23 , Beilen – The Netherlands , The Netherlands , Artistic impressions , Beautiful capture , Creative Impuls , Digital Creations , Fine Gold , Hairygits Elite , LOVELY FLICKR , Masters of Creative Photography , Photographic World , Roadster , The Pit Stop Shop , Wheels-Anything That Rolls , Your Best of Today , A photographers view , All types of transport , ANTICANDO!!! , Auto_Focus , BEST PEOPLE’S CHOICE , A feast for my eyes , The Machines , THE LOOK level 1 RED , Blink again , CAZADORES DE IMÁGENES , All kinds of transport , Blood sweat and gear , GEARHEADS , GREATPHOTOGRAPHERS , Cars cars and more cars , Cars cars cars , Digifoto Pro , Django’s Master , Damn cool photographers , FAIR PLAY , Friends Forever , InfiniteXposure , IQ – Image Quality , Give me 5 , Living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) , My friends pictures , PHOTOGRAPHERS , Nice as it gets , Planet Earth Transport , Planet Earth back in the day , Pro Photo , Slow ride , Showcase Images , Lovely shot , PhotoMix , Saariy’sQualityPictures , Transport of all kinds , The Red Group , Simply Because , …

Ford Comète Monte Carlo Coupé (5675)

Ford Comète Monte Carlo Coupé (5675)

Manufacturer: Ford Société Anonyme France (Ford SAF), Poissy / Paris – France
Type: Comète Monte Carlo Coupé 22CV
Engine: 3923cc Ford Flathead 239 V-8
Power: 105 bhp / 3.800 rpm
Speed: 156 km/h
Production time: 1954 – 1955
Production outlet: 699
Curb weight: 1470 kg

Special:
– This 2+2 seater fixed-head (notchback) Coupé was designed by Jean Daninos (Stabilimenti Industriali Giovanni Farina S.A., Torino – Italy, an older brother of the more famous Battista ‘Pinin’ Farina) and built by Facel Metallon SA, Paris – France (a French subsidiary of Ford), based on the French Ford Vedette with a Mercury chassis.
– At that time they were the most expensive Ford product in the world and the only Ford automobile with custom coachwork, although it didn’t even carry the Ford badge.
– Its V-8 engine, normally fitted to Ford trucks, but buyers didn’t like the idea of having a car with a "truck engine". High taxes and the high price (51% higher than a spacious four door Vendôme) didn’t made this model a “sales success”.
– During 1954, Ford SAF was sold and the Comète’s final year of production took place under Simca. The Simca Comète Monte-Carlo continued to be offered till July 1955.
– It has a three-speed manual gearbox, column shifter, a Zenith-Stromberg 32 DINX carburettor, a 63 liter fuel tank and rear wheel drive.
– The Facel chassis with steel body has a 106 inch wheelbase, MacPherson independent wheel axles, a large egg-crate grille (nicknamed “coupe-frites” or a “french-fry cutter” by the French), a fake hood scoop, a ribbed stainless steel dashboard, stainless steel door handles, an impressive jet-age three-spoked steering wheel, two-colour leather seat covers, steel wheels with chromed hubcaps and hydraulic drum brakes all round.
– A four-speed manual gearbox (pont-a-mousson gearbox) was optional, just like wire wheels, Dayton wheels and two-tone colouring.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2015-06-25 19:31:11

Tagged: , Clay , Ford Société Anonyme France (Ford SAF), Poissy / Paris – France , Ford Comète Monte Carlo Coupé , cf , French Automobile , French Sports Car , Jean Daninos , Stabilimenti Industriali Giovanni Farina S.A., Torino – Italy , Vianen – The Netherlands , Artistic impressions , Beautiful capture , Creative Impuls , Digital Creations , Fine Gold , Hairygits Elite , LOVELY FLICKR , Masters of Creative Photography , Photographic World , The Pit Stop Shop , Wheels-Anything That Rolls , Your Best of Today , A photographers view , All types of transport , ANTICANDO!!! , Auto_Focus , BEST PEOPLE’S CHOICE , A feast for my eyes , The Machines , THE LOOK level 1 RED , Blink again , CAZADORES DE IMÁGENES , All kinds of transport , Blood sweat and gear , GEARHEADS , GREATPHOTOGRAPHERS , Cars cars and more cars , Cars cars cars , Digifoto Pro , Django’s Master , Damn cool photographers , FAIR PLAY , Friends Forever , InfiniteXposure , IQ – Image Quality , Give me 5 , I Like It , I …

Cameron 16HP Runabout 1911(1050860)

Cameron 16HP Runabout 1911(1050860)

Manufacturer: Cameron Car Company, Beverly, Massachusetts – U.S.A.
Type: 16HP Runabout
Engine: 2369cc straight-4 air-cooled
Power: 16 bhp
Speed: unknown
Production time: 1903 – 1914
Production outlet: about 8,000
Curb weight: 454 kg

Special:
– Cameron Car Company is remembered for their air-cooled vehicles and for relocating often.
– At first at Rhode Island from 1902 to 1906, then in Brockton, Massachusetts from 1906 to 1908, then in Beverly, Massachusetts from 1909 to 1915, Norwalk, Connecticut in 1919, and finally in Stamford, Connecticut in 1920.
– Like many people in the exciting early days of the automobile industry, James E. Brown of the Brown Textile Machine Company in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, decided to go into the automobile manufacturing business in 1901. Everett S. Cameron was hired to designed the new vehicle. Experiments were conducted, improvements were made, and in 1903, Cameron automobile production began.
– No cars were produced from 1915 to 1918 (the company entered bankruptcy).
– During their career, they would produce trucks, tractors, marine, and aviation engines as well as cars and boats.
– The Runabout is probably designed by one of its founders, Everett S. Cameron.
– It has a three-speed manual gearbox, one carburetor and rear wheel drive (shaft driven).
– They had several innovate creations that would become industry standards, such as left-side (ight-hand drive was the accepted practice) steering wheels (wheel steering i.s.o. a tiller), front-mounted engines, air cooling, a revolutionary rear-mounted gearbox, the gear shift was mounted on the steering column and torque tube drive.
– With a lack of patent applications in the early days of production (as was the case with many manufacturers), it is unclear "who was first".
– Several Cameron’s were used in competition, including hill climbs and dirt track events. One example even captured a half-mile world record in Cincinnati, Ohio. Another example became the first air-cooled car to reach the top of Mount Washington without requiring a stop.
– Only 15 survivors.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2014-02-08 15:59:48

Tagged: , Cameron Car Company, Beverly, Massachusetts – U.S.A. , Cameron 16HP Runabout , cc , Brown Textile Machine Company in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, US , James E. Brown , Everett S. Cameron , a feast for my eyes , auto_focus , All types of transport , A Photographers View , Artistic impressions , blinkagain , beautiful capture , Build your rainbow , Creative Photo Group , Creative impuls , Cars cars and more cars , Cars Cars Cars , Creative Artists Cafe , digifoto Pro , Django’s Master , damn cool photographers , DREAMLIKE PHOTOS , Digital Creations , Friends Forever , Fan de Voitures , Fine gold , FotoArtCircle , gearheads , greatphotographers , ineffable , I like it , Kreative People , Love it , LOVELY FLICKR , Living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) , my_gear_and_me , MAGIC MOMENTS IN YOUR LIFE , My Friends Pictures , Masters of Creative Photography , Nice as it gets , Photographic World , Planet Earth Transport , Planet …

1965 MG MGB

1965 MG MGB

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …