Rolls-Royce 40/50HP Silver Ghost Boattail 1926 (5402)

Rolls-Royce 40/50HP Silver Ghost Boattail 1926 (5402)

Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Limited, Derby, England – UK
Type: 40/50HP Silver Ghost Boattail
Engine: 7668cc straight-6
Power: 100 bhp / 2.750 rpm
Speed: 120 km/h
Production time: 1919 – 1926
Production time: 1906 – 1926 (all Silver Ghosts)
Production outlet: unknown
Production outlet: 7,874 (all Silver Ghosts, including 1701 from the American Springfield factory)
Curb weight: 1383 kg

Special:
– In 1906, four chassis were built for the Olympia Motor Show. After a lot of interest from the public, manager Claude Johnson set one automobile (an open-top Roi-des-Belges body by coachbuilder Barker & Co. Limited, London) in “silver” (painted in aluminium paint with silver-plated fittings) and named it “Silver Ghost” by virtue of its appearance and “extraordinary stealthiness” (like a ghost).
– Chassis no. 60551, registered AX 201 (the 12th 40/50HP to be made), was the car that was originally given the name "Silver Ghost."
– That title was taken up by the press (the prestigious publication Autocar in 1907) and soon all 40/50HPs were called by that name, a fact not officially recognised by Rolls-Royce until 1925, when the Phantom range was launched.
– Proper production of the 40/50HP at Cooke Street, Manchester had not started until early 1907 after all the effort of preparing the first four motor cars for Olympia and the Paris show which followed.
– It has a centre-change four-speed manual gearbox , a cone type clutch, a Rolls-Royce carburettor, a 6-Volts electric system, dual ignition with coil and magneto and rear wheel drive.
– The chassis (partly steel and ash frame) has a walnut and highly varnished dashboard, leather upholstery, solid front axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs suspension,a live rear axle with cantilever leaf spring platform suspension, worm & nut steering, spoke wheels and internal expanding four-wheel mechanical brakes.
– Many rolling chassis were outfitted with luxurious bodies by some of the top coachbuilders in the industry, like Hooper, Barker, Park Ward, Thrupp & Maberly, James Young, H.J.Mulliner, Windover (London), Gurney Nutting, etc.
– A speed governor (cruise control) and four-wheel servo-assisted brakes (since 1923) were optional.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2015-04-15 12:58:48

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1971 Triumph Stag

1971 Triumph Stag

Oh the possibilities, sadly missed through poor design and negligence! You cannot deny then that it’s a British Leyland product, taking a car with a fantastic premise, but through sloppy workmanship make it something of nightmares! No car seems to encapsulate the problems with the nationalised company more than the humble Triumph Stag.

To compete with the likes of the Mercedes-Benz SL, British Leyland started work on a luxury Grand Tourer, styled by the world renowned Giovanni Michelotti, who had previously designed the Triumph 2000, the Triumph Herald and the Triumph TR6, and would later go on to design the ambiguous Austin Apache and the Leyland National bus. But either way his styling was sensational, but at the same time the car had substance too. In the late 1960’s America was on the verge of banning convertible cars to increase safety. So the engineers at Triumph designed what was a very clever T-Bar rollcage over the passenger cabin, meaning the car was not only safe, but also allowed the owners to enjoy what was craved most in a Grand Tourer, drop-top open-air fun! This was complimented by a selection of cars with removable Hard-Tops, although not as popular due to being slightly more complicated. The name was great too, sounding very manly with a hint of beast-like qualities, which for the most part helps to form the image, a strong and noble creature of the wild stood proud amongst its peers…

…only without the antlers!

In 1970 the car was launched to the motoring press with some very favourable initial reviews, admiring the styling, the firm suspension that resulted in a smooth ride and the well-balanced handling. The car was immediately an image setter for the new-money, like the Mercedes it was competing with it had the image of being something for those who had made their money through more underhanded methods, a cads car if you will. But we’ve all got to make our money somehow I guess!

However, lest we forget that this was a British Leyland product, so of course trouble was brewing. Very quickly the car gained a reputation for unreliability, which can be traced back to that all important piece of machinery known simply as the engine. In 1969 whilst the Triumph Stag was in development, Rover began using their new license built V8 engine derived from an American Buick 215 3L powerplant. Originally this was installed into the Rover P5, but a 3.5L version was installed as standard to the Rover P6 and the later SD1, as well as becoming the motive power behind the almighty Range Rover. The Rover V8 was an incredibly reliable and endlessly tunable engine, making it one of the most popular and successful powerplants in automotive history. It made its way into the TVR Chimera, the Morgan Plus 8, the TVR 350i, the Land Rover Defender, the Land Rover Discovery, the Sisu Nasu All-Terrain Military Transport, the MG RV8, the MGB GT, the TVR Griffith, the TVR S-Series, the …

Nissan GT-R

Nissan GT-R

The production version of the GT-R debuted at the 2007 Tokyo Motor Show, launching in the Japanese market on December 6, 2007. The U.S. official launch was 7 months later on July 07, 2008. Universal Nissan in Los Angeles provided a customer with the delivery of a new GT-R, fresh from the production line at 12:01 a.m., on July 7, 2008. The Canadian launch was also in July 2008. Europe became the third consumer market, where it launched late in the year. The large disparity in initial marketing between these regional releases is due to Nissan having to build GT-R performance centers where the car is serviced. Also the engine and rear-mounted dual-clutch gearbox are built by hand, thus limiting production to around 1000 cars a month.

Specifications

The Nissan GT-R is powered by the VR38DETT engine, a 3,799 cc (3.8 L; 231.8 cu in) DOHC V6. Two parallel Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) turbochargers provide forced induction. Production vehicles produce a manufacturer-claimed engine output of 480 bhp (360 kW) at 6400 rpm and 434 lb·ft (588 N·m) at 3200-5200 rpm. According to independent dynamometer tests, the GT-R produces 416 hp (310 kW) to 475 hp (354 kW) and 414 lb·ft (561 N·m) to 457 lb·ft (620 N·m) at the wheels. The engine also meets California Air Resources Board Ultra Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) standards. A curb weight of 1,730 kg (3,800 lb) or 1,736 kg (3,830 lb) with side curtain airbags is achieved using a jig welded steel chassis with aluminum used for the hood, trunk, and doors. A rear mounted 6 speed dual clutch semi-automatic transmission is used in conjunction with the ATTESA E-TS system to provide power to all four wheels and along with Nissan’s Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC-R) aids in stability. Three shift modes can also be selected for various conditions. The drag coefficient is 0.27.

Displacement: V6 3,799 cc (3.8 L; 231.8 cu in)
Horsepower: 480 bhp (360 kW) at 6400 rpm*
Torque: 430 lb·ft (580 N·m)*
Twin Turbo maximum boost: 17.8 psi (123 kPa)*
Redline: 7000 rpm
Drivetrain: Premium Midship AWD
Curb weight: estimated 3,800 lb (1,700 kg)*
Production: 2500 units per year (US)
Price: US$76,840 to US$79,090
Top Speed: 193 mph (311 km/h)*
* manufacturer claimed

Performance

Nissan claims the GT-R can reach a top speed of 192 mph (309 km/h), Motor Trend recorded a top speed of 195.0 mph (313.8 km/h). It has been tested to achieve 0-60 mph (97 km/h) times as low as 3.2 seconds with "launch control" and 3.9 seconds without (improved to 3.5 seconds in models produced since March 2009). Nissan’s chief vehicle engineer Kazutoshi Mizuno has indicated that he has never used the term "launch control", which refers to the act of turning off vehicle dynamic control (VDC) and launch the car at around 4500 rpm. The GT-R user’s manual states that turning off the VDC is only meant for escaping low-traction situations such as mud or snow, and that damage to the transmission is not covered under …

10 AC 378 GT Zagato (2012)

10 AC 378 GT Zagato (2012)

AC 378 GT Zagato (2012) Engine 6200cc V8
AC CARS SET
www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157623759779024…
The AC 378 GT Zagato was designed by Italian styling house Zagato and built in South Africa by Hi-Tech Automotive. Unveiled at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show, the design was first shown in 2009 as the Perana Z-One. Now badged as an AC sales were expected to commence late 2012.
The car is powered by a 437bhp 6.2 litre V8 sourced GM engine available in the Chevrolet Camero range. Weighing 1,465 kg the company estimates 0-60mph acceleration in under 4 seconds with a top speed of 185mph. The car does not eature any electronic driver aids

Shot at the Goodwood Festival of Speed 30:06:2012 Ref: 87-010

Posted by robertknight16 on 2013-11-25 19:01:47

Tagged: , AC , British , South.Africa , 2010’s , worldcars …

1967 MG MGB

1967 MG MGB

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …