Bentley S1 Continental Park Ward Fixed-Head Coupé 1957

Bentley S1 Continental Park Ward Fixed-Head Coupé 1957

Bentley ranks amongst the famous makes in history. Founded by W.O.Bentley in 1919, his cars were most successful in racing, having won the 24 Hours of Le Mans no less than 5 times. The Great Depression and the fading support by its financier Woolf Barnato led to the end of the W.O. period in 1931, when the company was taken over by its rival Rolls-Royce and production moved to Derby. After World War II, the Rolls-Royce plant was moved from Derby to Crewe. Although in the process of industrialisation, Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars were made in the new "Standard Steel" version (car totally built in house including coachwork), the more luxurious "Coachbuilt" version was still available to special offer. For the "Coachbuilt" version, the manufacturer built the "rolling chassis" but then commissioned the coachwork to an authorised coachbuilder, allowing the customer to choose from a variety of different coachwork designs.
From 1950 until 1959, all Bentley cars featured the 6-cylinder engine legendary from the Thirties, gradually upgraded to 4.5 litre, and 4.9 litre after 1959. No other engine offers the silence, smoothness and total absence of any vibration like the Bentley 6-cylinder engine. The subsequent Bentley V8 engine after 1959 was clearly stronger, but not nearly as refined.
Only Bentley (not Rolls-Royce) cars were optionally available with the "Continental" option, an upgrade featuring a more sporty suspension, a higher rear axle ratio and a rev counter instrument, suitable for long distance high-speed cruising. This "Continental" option made these large and elegant Bentley cars surprisingly sporty and nimble to drive. On the coachwork side, one particular model is a milestone in the history of Postwar Bentley cars – the S1 Continental Park Ward Coupé. For reasons never quite understood, the S1 Continental Park Ward handles infinitely better than its contemporaries by H.J.Mulliner, James Young, etc, which must have to do with the way that the bodies are attached to the chassis. Another quality makes the S1 Continental Park Ward unique – its outstanding coachwork design which is elegant yet very sporty.
This particular car, the S1 Continental Park Ward Fixed-Head Coupé chassis N°BC38LCH is very special for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is one of only 33 cars built with left hand drive (of which only some 10 examples were made with the small rear quarter window). Secondly, it was totally restored by foremost expert P. & A. Wood from 2005 until 2009, including a number of special upgrades such as secondary fuel pump system, auxiliary fan system and fully integrated air conditioning. No other Fifties grand touring coupé car offer performances and comfort quite like this car.

Chassis : N°BC38LCH
Engine : N°BC37C
Engine Specification : 6-cylinder with 4887 cc
Equipment : Small rear quarter window, fully integrated air conditioning system

Posted by tautaudu02 on 2013-04-29 18:36:40

Tagged: , bentley , s1 , continental , park , ward , fixed , head , coupé , auto , moto , cars , coches , voitures , automobile , rétromobile , …

Alvis Speed 20 Tourer 1932

Alvis Speed 20 Tourer 1932

Belem, Lisbon, Portugal

in Wikipedia

Alvis cars were produced by the manufacturer Alvis Car and Engineering Company Ltd of Coventry, United Kingdom from 1919 to 1967. The company also produced aero-engines and military vehicles, the latter continuing long after car production ceased.

Beginnings

The original company, TG John and Co. Ltd., was founded in 1919. Its first products were stationary engines, carburettor bodies and motorscooters. The company’s founder T.G. John was approached by Geoffrey de Freville with designs for a 4-cylinder engine with aluminium pistons and pressure lubrication, unusual for the period. Some have suggested that de Freville proposed the name Alvis as a compound of the words "aluminium" and "vis" (meaning "strength" in Latin) although de Freville himself vigorously denied this theory. Perhaps the name was derived from the Norse mythological weaponsmith, Alvíss, but the true origin is unknown.

The first car model, the 10/30, using de Freville’s design was an instant success and set the reputation for quality and performance for which the company became famous. Following complaints from the Avro aviation company whose logo bore similarities to the original winged green triangle, the more familiar inverted red triangle incorporating the word ‘Alvis’ evolved. In 1921, the company changed its name and became the Alvis Car and Engineering Company Ltd. and moved production to Holyhead Road, Coventry where from 1922 to 1923 they also made the Buckingham car.

In 1923 Captain GT Smith-Clarke joined from Daimler as Chief Engineer and Works Manager and was soon joined by WM Dunn as Chief Draughtsman. This partnership lasted for 25 years and was responsible for producing some of the most successful products in the company’s history.
The original 10/30 side-valve engine was developed progressively becoming by 1923 the famous overhead-valve 12/50, produced until 1932 and one of the most successful vintage sports cars of all time. Exhilarating performance and rugged reliability meant that around 350 of these 12/50 hp cars and 60 of the later (and latterly concurrent) 12/60 hp survive today representing some 10 percent of total production.

1927 saw the introduction of the six-cylinder 14.75 h.p. and this engine became the basis for the long line of luxurious six-cylinder Alvis cars produced up to the outbreak of war. Not only were these cars extremely elegant but they were full of technical innovations. Independent front suspension and the world’s first all-synchromesh gearbox came in 1933 followed by servo assisted brakes. A front wheel drive model was introduced (from 1928 to 1930), a model bristling with innovation with front wheel drive, in-board brakes, overhead camshaft and, as an option, a Roots type supercharger.

Smith-Clarke designed remarkable models during the 1930s and 1940s — including the handsome, low-slung six-cylinder Speed 20, the Speed 25 (considered by many to be one of the finest cars produced in the 1930s) and the 4.3 Litre model. As with many upmarket engineering companies of the time Alvis did not produce their own coachwork relying instead on the many available Midlands coachbuilders such as Cross and Ellis, …

Riley Brooklands 1930

Riley Brooklands 1930

Belem, Lisbon, Portugal

in Wikipedia

Riley was a British motorcar and bicycle manufacturer from 1890. The company became part of the Nuffield Organisation in 1938 and was later merged into British Leyland: late in 1969 British Leyland announced their discontinuance of Riley production, although 1969 was a difficult year for the UK auto industry and so a number of cars from the company’s inventory are likely to have been first registered only in 1970.[2]
Today, the Riley trademark is owned by BMW.

Riley Cycle Company

Riley began as the Bonnick Cycle Company of Coventry, England. During the pedal cycle craze that swept Britain at the end of the nineteenth century, in 1890, William Riley Jr. purchased the company and in 1896 renamed it the Riley Cycle Company.[2] Later, cycle gear maker Sturmey Archer was added to the portfolio. Riley’s younger son, Percy, left school in the same year and soon began to dabble in automobiles. He built his first car at 16, in 1898, secretly, because his father did not approve. It featured the first mechanically operated inlet valve. By 1899, Percy Riley moved from producing motorcycles to his first prototype four-wheeled quadricycle. Little is known about Percy Riley’s very first "motor-car". It is, however, well attested that the engine featured mechanically operated cylinder valves at a time when other engines depended on the vacuum effect of the descending piston to suck the inlet valve(s) open. That was demonstrated some years later when Benz developed and patented a mechanically operated inlet valve process of their own but were unable to collect royalties on their system from British companies; the courts were persuaded that the system used by British auto-makers was based the one pioneered by Percy, which had comfortably anticipated equivalent developments in Germany.[2] In 1900, Riley sold a single three-wheeled automobile. Meanwhile the elder of the Riley brothers, Victor Riley, although supportive of his brother’s embryonic motor-car enterprise, devoted his energies at this stage to the core bicycle business.[2]

Company founder William Riley remained resolutely opposed to diverting the resources of his bicycle business into motor cars, and in 1902 three of his sons, Victor, Percy and younger brother Alan Riley pooled resources, borrowed a necessary balancing amount from their mother and in 1903 established the separate Riley Engine Company, also in Coventry.[2] A few years later the other two Riley brothers, Stanley and Cecil, having left school joined their elder brothers in the business.[2] At first, the Riley Engine Company simply supplied engines for Riley motorcycles and also to Singer, a newly emerging motor cycle manufacturer in the area,[2] but the Riley Engine Company company soon began to focus on four-wheeled automobiles. Their Vee-Twin Tourer prototype, produced in 1905, can be considered the first proper Riley car. The Engine Company expanded the next year. William Riley reversed his former opposition to his sons’ preference for motorised vehicles and Riley Cycle halted motorcycle production in 1907 to focus on automobiles.[2] Bicycle production also ceased in 1911.

In 1912, the …