ACP (Touring Club of Portugal) tow (Hanomag, 1959)

ACP (Touring Club of Portugal) tow (Hanomag, 1959)

Lisbon, Portugal

in Wikipedia

History

Hanomag Railway Engine built in 1932
The company dates back to 1835 when Georg Egestorff founded a company called Eisen-Giesserei und Maschinenfabrik Hannover to build small steam engines. They soon started making farm machinery and in 1846 built their first railway locomotive for the Hannover State Railways. By 1870 they had made 500 locomotives and in 1871 changed their name to Hannoversche Maschinenbau AG. Road vehicles followed when in 1905 they received a contract for steam waggons for the German army.
Petrol engined vehicles followed in 1912 with a line of farm tractors.
[edit]Cars

Hanomag 2/10PS "Kommissbrot"

Hanomag 1.5 Litre "Rekord"
By the 1920s, the market for steam road vehicles was in terminal decline and Hanomag looked to cars as the future, particularly economy models. In 1925, they launched the Hanomag 2/10, a 370 kg (816 lb) open two seater with a rear-mounted 500cc[1] single-cylinder water cooled engine. Named Zweisitzer Limousine (two-seat limousine)[2] by the company, its rounded front and rear gained it the nickname Kommissbrot for its resemblance to a loaf of Army bread. Although made in large numbers, 15,775 in total, it did not make much money for the company and in the late 1920s the railway locomotive division was sold to Henschel & Son of Kassel.
A more conventional car, the 3/16PS, and the first diesel engined tractors, came in 1928, taking the company back into profit. Hanomag were badly hurt by the drop in trade in 1929 and built a large stock of unsold vehicles. Things improved in 1930 and the company got 14 per cent of the domestic car market, second place behind Opel, but in 1931 a new crisis came when the banks called a loan. The factory was mortgaged to Hannover City and the Vereinigte Stahlwerke trust and the company relaunched as Hanomag Automobil und Schlepperbau GmbH.
For 1932, a new small car, the 1.1 Litre, renamed the Garant in 1934, was announced and sold well allowing two shift working to be introduced and it was joined by the larger 1.5 litre Rekord (a name later used by Opel) in 1933 with independent front suspension. A diesel Rekord was shown at the 1936 Berlin Motor Show.
[edit]Military vehicles
During World War II, the car plant made military vehicle engines, a military version of their heavy tractor renamed the SS-100, and half track troop carriers. Hanomag 20 B, a 4-wheel-drive Small Unit-Personnel Carrier was produced 1937-1940 (ca. 2000) under the parentage of Stoewer. Capacity problems by Stoewer resulted in co-production by both BMW and Hanomag. Together the three manufacturers made ca. 10.000 units. The special 4-wheel-steering system was fitted on most models. Operating a "lock-level" between the front seats made the steerable rear axle turn sideways to a certain angle.
The single most important and iconic military vehicle to be designed and built by Hanomag during World War II was the Sd.Kfz. 251 half-track (commonly called simply "the Hanomag") with a total production numbering just over 15,000. Built to …

1970 MG MGB GT

1970 MG MGB GT

Certainly one of the more popular versions of the MGB, and my favourite version of them all, the MGB GT gave the plucky British sports car a hard top for those who didn’t live in the south of France and didn’t like the idea of rain filling up the footwell.

The MGB GT was first built in 1965, sporting a revolutionary ‘Greenhouse’ cabin designed by Pininfarina, and featured a very swish looking hatchback and fastback rear. The car was perfect for the American market too as the threat of banning convertible cars loomed over world motor manufacturers, but the GT didn’t survive there long and was removed from the market in 1974.

From the GT though many different variations came into being under British Leyland. In 1967 the MGC was built, a short lived venture that included the fitting of a much larger BMC engine, but this resulted in weighing down the front suspension and creating a large bulge in the bonnet.

This was replaced in 1973 by the MGB GT V8, a reworked version fitted with the famous Rover V8 engine, but this too didn’t last long and construction was killed off in 1976.

However, the original MGB GT continued to soldier on until the end of the MGB line in 1980, and today holds quite a fond fanbase as simple, fun motoring.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2014-11-10 12:02:23

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , bus , truck , motor , motor vehicle , saloon , estate , compact , sports , roadster , transport , road , heritage , historic , MG , MG MGB GT , MGB GT …

Excellent (And Helpful!) Auto Repair Guidelines

Excellent (And Helpful!) Auto Repair Guidelines

Whenever your car fails, it merely enables you to the happiest person on earth, right? Of course not, and you want to find out more about what you can do in this case. You want to know what you can do before this situation occurs again. Read on to learn some good advice on auto repair.

Be aware of mechanics who perform unnecessary repairs on the car. A trustworthy mechanic should notify you about parts which can be becoming worn and definately will need replacement in the future, but no parts needs to be replaced without first getting the approval. Avoid mechanics who have previously done work without your proceed.

Your automobile owners manual is truly a valuable self-help guide to the workings of your own car. Which means that you should not trash it when you leave the dealer. It will tell you from what that light on the dash means, to the best way to perform basic maintenance on the particular model.

Make certain your auto technician is capable to work with your unique car. Motor vehicles are complex machines and each and every brand has unique characteristics. Some brands require special tools, parts, and procedures. Many standard auto technicians either lack these things or dont ask them to easily accessible. Without these things, they can’t fix your automobile.

Keep a basic repair kit inside your car trunk constantly. A basic kit comprising wrenches, jumper cables, screws, as well as a jack can be quite a lifesaver should your car fails on the streets. This will assist you to make small repairs on the spot, saving you the expense of a high priced tow truck.

Do you experience feeling like you are ready to consider the industry of auto repair? If you are gaining confidence to perform the repairs yourself or know what you can do regarding getting the vehicle off to the right professional, it is possible to surely identify with all the tips that were provided. It’s time to get going with those auto repairs. www.acemobilemechanicsmiami.com/

Posted by shawncambira on 2014-08-22 04:29:37

Tagged: , car , truck , maintenance , automotive …

1970 Plymouth Sport Fury

1970 Plymouth Sport Fury

The furious Fury, a name that rocked the American automotive industry for the best part of 20 years, powerful and precise, and a true car of evolution.

Originally when it was launched in 1956, the Plymouth Fury was a contemporary space-age looking runaround, similar in fashion to the Cadillacs and Chryslers of the time. It was a very pretty car, as were pretty much all cars from back then, but the change of style didn’t do the Plymouth any favours. The fins and space lines of the 50’s gave way to the angles of the early-60’s, and many Chrysler products of this period were maligned heavily for it, the 3rd Generation Fury being no exception. A comeback however was made with the 4th Generation, which presented us with the symbolic vertical headlight layout that would be iconised in the Dukes of Hazzard, as a slew of Police Vehicles.

The 1969 models featured Chrysler’s new round-sided "Fuselage" styling. The Fury was again available as a 2-door coupe, 2-door convertible, 4-door hardtop, 4-door sedan, and 4-door station wagon. For 1970, the VIP was discontinued and a 4-door hardtop was added to the Sport Fury range, which also gained a new hardtop coupe. This was available in "GT" trim; 1970–71 Sport Fury GT models were powered by the 7.2L engine, which in 1970 could be ordered "6-barrel" carburetion consisting of three 2-barrel carburetors.

With the introduction of the 1969 body style, trim lines once again included the fleet-intended Fury I, volume models Fury II and Fury III, the sport-model Sport Fury and the top-line VIP. For 1970, the VIP was dropped, with the Sport Fury line expanded to include a four-door hardtop sedan. An optional Brougham package, which included individually-adjustable split bench seats with passenger recliner and luxurious trim comparable to the former VIP series, was available on Sport Furys; a Sport Fury GT and S/23 models took over the sport model space in the lineup. The S/23 was dropped for 1971, with new options including an electric sunroof (for top-line models) and a stereo tape player with a microphone, to allow drivers to record off the radio or take dictation.

For 1972, the Fury was facelifted with a large chrome twin-loop bumper design with a small insignia space between the loops and hidden headlamps as standard equipment on the Sport Suburban, and the newly introduced Fury Gran Coupe and Gran Sedan, which eventually would become the Plymouth Gran Fury; the Sport Fury and GT models were dropped, with the new Fury Gran series having the Brougham package available. Later in the year, hidden headlamps became an option on all models.[citation needed] For 1973, the front end was redesigned again with a new grille and headlamp setup, along with federally mandated 5mph bumpers.

When the new bodystyle was introduced in 1969, the 225 cubic-inch six-cylinder engine continued as standard on the Fury I, II and select III models, with the 318 cubic-inch V8 standard on the Sport Fury, some Fury III models and …

1971 Triumph Stag

1971 Triumph Stag

Oh the possibilities, sadly missed through poor design and negligence! You cannot deny then that it’s a British Leyland product, taking a car with a fantastic premise, but through sloppy workmanship make it something of nightmares! No car seems to encapsulate the problems with the nationalised company more than the humble Triumph Stag.

To compete with the likes of the Mercedes-Benz SL, British Leyland started work on a luxury Grand Tourer, styled by the world renowned Giovanni Michelotti, who had previously designed the Triumph 2000, the Triumph Herald and the Triumph TR6, and would later go on to design the ambiguous Austin Apache and the Leyland National bus. But either way his styling was sensational, but at the same time the car had substance too. In the late 1960’s America was on the verge of banning convertible cars to increase safety. So the engineers at Triumph designed what was a very clever T-Bar rollcage over the passenger cabin, meaning the car was not only safe, but also allowed the owners to enjoy what was craved most in a Grand Tourer, drop-top open-air fun! This was complimented by a selection of cars with removable Hard-Tops, although not as popular due to being slightly more complicated. The name was great too, sounding very manly with a hint of beast-like qualities, which for the most part helps to form the image, a strong and noble creature of the wild stood proud amongst its peers…

…only without the antlers!

In 1970 the car was launched to the motoring press with some very favourable initial reviews, admiring the styling, the firm suspension that resulted in a smooth ride and the well-balanced handling. The car was immediately an image setter for the new-money, like the Mercedes it was competing with it had the image of being something for those who had made their money through more underhanded methods, a cads car if you will. But we’ve all got to make our money somehow I guess!

However, lest we forget that this was a British Leyland product, so of course trouble was brewing. Very quickly the car gained a reputation for unreliability, which can be traced back to that all important piece of machinery known simply as the engine. In 1969 whilst the Triumph Stag was in development, Rover began using their new license built V8 engine derived from an American Buick 215 3L powerplant. Originally this was installed into the Rover P5, but a 3.5L version was installed as standard to the Rover P6 and the later SD1, as well as becoming the motive power behind the almighty Range Rover. The Rover V8 was an incredibly reliable and endlessly tunable engine, making it one of the most popular and successful powerplants in automotive history. It made its way into the TVR Chimera, the Morgan Plus 8, the TVR 350i, the Land Rover Defender, the Land Rover Discovery, the Sisu Nasu All-Terrain Military Transport, the MG RV8, the MGB GT, the TVR Griffith, the TVR S-Series, the …