Unusual car accident – zoomed in

Unusual car accident - zoomed in

On my way to work this morning an unusual accident happened on the Oxford ringroad, by the Tesco roundabout. (Time approx 8.45am)

As you can see from the photo, this little car got literally ‘lifted’ onto the concrete bollards in the middle of the road! The passengers inside seemed to be unharmed – though a little shaken. Or should I say ‘spun’?

Several cars and a lorry had stopped on the hard shoulder of the sliproad, presumably either having been involved or helping out.

Posted by allispossible.org.uk on 2007-06-08 08:32:02

Tagged: , accident , car , car accident , oxford , human error , auto , unfall , auto unfall , traffic , oops , error , mistake , news , reportage , whoops , funny , hanging , sitting , prang , shock , surprise , grey , ringroad , cowley , 10000views , unusual car accident , flip flops , flickereenos , flickreenos , transport , voiture , dough …

Oh the joys of the open road!

Oh the joys of the open road!

Timeline of motoring history 1940 – 2008

1940
Car production in Britain is put on hold as most factories go over to munitions production.

The German Luftwaffe destroys the centre of Coventry.

Oldsmobile and Cadillac offer the first fully automatic transmission.

Enzo Ferrari leaves Alfa Romeo to establish Auto-Avio Costruzioni Ferrari.

In Japan, Toyo Kogyo produces its first passenger car.

1941
Lord Austin dies aged 74

Louis Chevrolet dies aged 63. He is buried at Indianapolis, scene of his greatest racing victories.

Packard are the first car manufacturer to offer air conditioning.

Chrysler introduces the Fluid Drive transmission, a manual transmission with a fluid coupling instead of a clutch.

1943
American passenger car production falls to just 139 vehicles as war production requirements take over.

1944
Volvo focus on occupant safety with the introduction of a safety cage.

Louis Renault is arrested and imprisoned for collaborating with the Germans. He dies at Fresnes prison in ‘suspicious circumstances’.

Enzo Ferrari’s Maranello workshops are bombed and destroyed.

1945
2nd World War in Europe ends with Germany’s unconditional surrender to the allies on May 7th.

In receivership since 1939, Triumph is acquired by Standard.

Petrol rationing in Britain continues.

Henry Ford resigns as president of The Ford Motor Company, handing over to his grandson, Henry Ford 11.

French President Charles de Gaulle nationalizes Renault and the company’s name is changed to Regié Nationale des Usines Renault.

The newly elected Socialist government ‘encourages’ manufacturers to export half their output. To counteract the consequential development of an illicit black-market car buyers are required to sign a covenant preventing the sale of new cars for one year.

1946

Newly designed post-war models are launched by British car makers Triumph, Armstrong-Siddeley, Jowett and Bentley as the British Motor Industry celebrates its fiftieth birthday.

Petrol ration for British motorists is increased by 50 per cent.

Ford of Britain produce their millionth car, an 8hp Anglia.

Michelin patent the Radial-ply tyre.

In light of negative wartime connotations William Lyons changes the name of SS Cars Ltd. to Jaguar Cars Ltd and begins to focus on export markets.

Enzo Ferrari rebuilds his bombed workshops and begins work on the development and production of the Ferrari 125 Sport. The first Ferrari hits the road!

1947
Packard offers power seats and windows across their range.

Ettore Bugatti dies in Paris aged 66.

The American car industry celebrates its Golden Jubilee.

Henry Ford dies at the age of 84.

BMW engine and car designs are ‘acquired’ by Bristol and Frazer-Nash as ‘war reparations’.

David Brown, already successful in the British engineering industry, sees an advertisement in The Times offering ‘A high-class motor business, established 25 years’ and pays £20.000 to buy Aston Martin. He has already purchased Lagonda, having owned a Lagonda Rapide himself in the past.

A new name, Standard-Vanguard, is introduced to the British public

Instead of taxing cars based on the 1906 RAC horsepower formula a flat- rate system is introduced.

Enzo Ferrari’s 125 Sport wins its first race. The …

London Cadillac in Black and White

London Cadillac in Black and White

Please don’t use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved </b

Cadillac is currently the second oldest American automobile manufacturer behind fellow GM marque Buick and is among the oldest automobile brands in the world. Depending on how one chooses to measure, Cadillac is arguably older than Buick. Cadillac was founded in 1902 by Henry Leland,[5] a master mechanic and entrepreneur, who named the company after his ancestor, Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, the founder of the city of Detroit. The company’s crest is based on a coat of arms that Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac had created at the time of his marriage in Quebec in 1687. General Motors purchased the company in 1909 and within six years, Cadillac had laid the foundation for the modern mass production of automobiles by demonstrating the complete interchangeability of its precision parts while simultaneously establishing itself as America’s premier luxury car. Cadillac introduced technological advances, including full electrical systems, the clashless manual transmission and the steel roof. The brand developed three engines, one of which (the V8 engine) set the standard for the American automotive industry. Cadillac is the first American car to win the prestigious Dewar Trophy from the Royal Automobile Club of England, having successfully demonstrated the interchangeability of its component parts during a reliability test in 1908; this spawned the firm’s slogan "Standard of the World." It won that trophy a second time, in 1912, for incorporating electric starting and lighting in a production automobile.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac

Posted by ArtOnWheels on 2012-10-31 12:39:46

Tagged: , Black and White , London , UK , Car , Cadillac , Classic , Cars , Automobile , Custom , B&W , Fins , Urban , City , American , General Motors , Motor , Auto , Transport , Old , Oldie , 50’s , Rock and Roll , Music , Lifestyle , V8 , Engine , Light , Shadows , Engineering , Art , worldcars , BLACK & WHITE PHOTOS …

1970 MG MGB GT

1970 MG MGB GT

Certainly one of the more popular versions of the MGB, and my favourite version of them all, the MGB GT gave the plucky British sports car a hard top for those who didn’t live in the south of France and didn’t like the idea of rain filling up the footwell.

The MGB GT was first built in 1965, sporting a revolutionary ‘Greenhouse’ cabin designed by Pininfarina, and featured a very swish looking hatchback and fastback rear. The car was perfect for the American market too as the threat of banning convertible cars loomed over world motor manufacturers, but the GT didn’t survive there long and was removed from the market in 1974.

From the GT though many different variations came into being under British Leyland. In 1967 the MGC was built, a short lived venture that included the fitting of a much larger BMC engine, but this resulted in weighing down the front suspension and creating a large bulge in the bonnet.

This was replaced in 1973 by the MGB GT V8, a reworked version fitted with the famous Rover V8 engine, but this too didn’t last long and construction was killed off in 1976.

However, the original MGB GT continued to soldier on until the end of the MGB line in 1980, and today holds quite a fond fanbase as simple, fun motoring.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2014-11-10 12:02:23

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , bus , truck , motor , motor vehicle , saloon , estate , compact , sports , roadster , transport , road , heritage , historic , MG , MG MGB GT , MGB GT …

1970 Plymouth Sport Fury

1970 Plymouth Sport Fury

The furious Fury, a name that rocked the American automotive industry for the best part of 20 years, powerful and precise, and a true car of evolution.

Originally when it was launched in 1956, the Plymouth Fury was a contemporary space-age looking runaround, similar in fashion to the Cadillacs and Chryslers of the time. It was a very pretty car, as were pretty much all cars from back then, but the change of style didn’t do the Plymouth any favours. The fins and space lines of the 50’s gave way to the angles of the early-60’s, and many Chrysler products of this period were maligned heavily for it, the 3rd Generation Fury being no exception. A comeback however was made with the 4th Generation, which presented us with the symbolic vertical headlight layout that would be iconised in the Dukes of Hazzard, as a slew of Police Vehicles.

The 1969 models featured Chrysler’s new round-sided "Fuselage" styling. The Fury was again available as a 2-door coupe, 2-door convertible, 4-door hardtop, 4-door sedan, and 4-door station wagon. For 1970, the VIP was discontinued and a 4-door hardtop was added to the Sport Fury range, which also gained a new hardtop coupe. This was available in "GT" trim; 1970–71 Sport Fury GT models were powered by the 7.2L engine, which in 1970 could be ordered "6-barrel" carburetion consisting of three 2-barrel carburetors.

With the introduction of the 1969 body style, trim lines once again included the fleet-intended Fury I, volume models Fury II and Fury III, the sport-model Sport Fury and the top-line VIP. For 1970, the VIP was dropped, with the Sport Fury line expanded to include a four-door hardtop sedan. An optional Brougham package, which included individually-adjustable split bench seats with passenger recliner and luxurious trim comparable to the former VIP series, was available on Sport Furys; a Sport Fury GT and S/23 models took over the sport model space in the lineup. The S/23 was dropped for 1971, with new options including an electric sunroof (for top-line models) and a stereo tape player with a microphone, to allow drivers to record off the radio or take dictation.

For 1972, the Fury was facelifted with a large chrome twin-loop bumper design with a small insignia space between the loops and hidden headlamps as standard equipment on the Sport Suburban, and the newly introduced Fury Gran Coupe and Gran Sedan, which eventually would become the Plymouth Gran Fury; the Sport Fury and GT models were dropped, with the new Fury Gran series having the Brougham package available. Later in the year, hidden headlamps became an option on all models.[citation needed] For 1973, the front end was redesigned again with a new grille and headlamp setup, along with federally mandated 5mph bumpers.

When the new bodystyle was introduced in 1969, the 225 cubic-inch six-cylinder engine continued as standard on the Fury I, II and select III models, with the 318 cubic-inch V8 standard on the Sport Fury, some Fury III models and …