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Roadster | StroG

 

Tag Archives: roadster

Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

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Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be a popular aircraft, with approximately 55 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums all over the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell designed the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. However, because of its higher performance, Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved, sometimes dramatically, over the course of its life.

Mk V (Types 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Group Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the wide bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and "clipped" wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber series over Britain would be the start of a new sustained high altitude bombing offensive by the Luftwaffe, in which case development was put in hand for a pressurised version of the Spitfire, with a new version of the Merlin (the Mk VI). It would take …

Ford Model T Touring 1914 (8367)

Ford Model T Touring 1914 (8367)

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan – U.S.A.
Type: Model T Touring
Engine: 2896cc straight-4
Power: 22 bhp / 1.600 rpm
Speed: 72 km/h
Production time: 1908 – 1927
Production outlet: 15,458,781
Curb weight: 750 kg

Special:
– On October 1, 1908, the company introduced the successful Ford Model T (also known as Tin Lizzie, Tin Lizzy, T‑Model Ford, Model T, or T), designed by Childe Harold Wills, Joseph A. Galamb and Eugene Farkas,
– At first assembled in Piquette plant and from 1910 in the Highland Park plant.
– It was Fords first mass production car (instead of individual hand crafting). The chassis was drawn by workers on a carriage trough the factory. Later, the sleds were replaced by carts on rails and mechanically drawn ("electric lines").
– This was not the first production line with completely interchangeable parts ever (that was Olds Motor Works, Lansing, Michigan – USA with the Model R Curved Dash), but it was the first time an entire plant worked with this system.
– The bodies were still to 1919 from other manufacturers, notably OJ Beaudette and Kelsey.
– It was Americas first automobile with standard left hand steering, while driving on the right was "the right way".
– The ignition system used an unusual trembler coil system to drive the spark plugs (used only for stationary gas engines) but made the T more flexible to use a range of fuels, like gasoline, kerosene or ethanol.
– The Ts in-line engine was the first engine with a removable cylinder head.
– The transmission is a standard two-speed planetary unit with a magneto located in front of the flywheel. This magneto supplied ignition current generated in a set of stationary coils.
– One had to have special driving techniques in order to keep the planetary gearing under control. So in many States you needed an extra / special driver’s licence.
– The early models had a foot-operated transmission brake and hand-operated rear wheel mechanical drum brakes.
– An option were the "Rocky Mountain Brakes", additional external band brakes only on the rear axle.
– The parking brake works on the tie rods to the drum brakes on the rear axle.
– The suspension employed a transversely mounted semi-elliptical spring for each of the front and rear beam axles which allowed a great deal of wheel movement to cope with the dirt roads of the time.
– The Model T’s built prior to 1919 were supplied with non-demountable wheels. This meant that if a flat tire occurred, the tire had to be removed from the rim and a new tube installed. In 1919, demountable wheels were available which allowed for a spare rim with the tire attached to be carried.
– The wheels were wooden artillery wheels with pneumatic clincher type tires, with steel welded-spoke wheels available in 1926 and 1927.
– Balloon tires with steel wires reinforcing the tire bead became available in 1925.
– Henry Ford: “Any customer can have a car painted any …