1964 Ferrari 250 Lusso

1964 Ferrari 250 Lusso

One of the rarest of the rare, the Ferrari flagship of the 1950’s and 60’s that took the world by storm, thunder, and any other meteorological metaphors you wish to insert!

Certainly a close second to the mighty Daytona’s beauty, the Ferrari 250 was once one of the world’s most desirable cars, with those crisp smooth lines and iconic engine sound echoing across both Europe and the USA.

The car was also built in a myriad of variations, 8 racing models, 2 Export/Europa models, and 14 GT models, including the Pininfarina Coupé Speciale, the Berlinetta "Tour de France" and the Spyder California SWB.

This particular version is a 250GT Lusso, manufactured between 1963 and 64. Sometimes known as the GTL, GT/L or Berlinetta Lusso, it is larger and more luxurious than the 250GT Berlinetta. The 250GT Lusso, which was not intended to compete in sports car racing, is considered to be one of the most elegant Ferraris.

Keeping in line with the Ferrari tradition of the time, the 250GT Lusso was designed by the Turinese coachbuilder Pininfarina, and bodied by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. Although the interior was more spacious than that of the 250 GT, the 250 GT Lusso remained a two-seat GT coupe, unlike the 250 GTE. The car was manufactured for only eighteen months, from early 1963 to mid 1964, and was the last model of Ferrari 250GT generation.

Auto shows often provide an opportunity for manufacturers to introduce new designs publicly. Ferrari did so at the 1962 Paris Motor Show to unveil, as a prototype, the 250 GT Lusso. The prototype was almost identical to the production version, and only minor details changed thereafter.

The new model was a way for Ferrari to fill a void left between the sporty 250GT SWB and the luxurious 250GTE 2+2, the Lusso met the new demands of the 1960s. Indeed, fans of sporting driving of the time became as fond of civilized designs, that is, comfortable and spacious, as they were of radical sports cars. Ferrari did not skimp on details in the GTL, which shows on the scales; weight ranged from 2,250 to 2,890lb, depending on equipment.

Unusually brief for a Ferrari model, GTL’s production began January 1963 and ended August 1964. According to a longstanding American expert on Ferrari, Peter Coltrin, the construction of the 250 GT Lusso must have begun soon after the presentation of the prototype of the Paris Motor Show.

Although it was not intended to compete, the 250 GT Lusso made a few appearances in several sporting events in 1964 and 1965, such as the Targa Florio and the Tour de France. The final iteration of the 250GT series, 351 copies of GT Lusso were produced before being replaced by the Ferrari 275 GTB. Originally sold for $13,375, the GTL saw sales in 2010 between $400,000 and $500,000, and 2013 values were approaching 4 times this figure.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2015-03-28 20:20:07

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , …

Trabant Cabriolet

Trabant Cabriolet

Cut the top off your Trabbi and you’ve got yourself a wild ride!

Yes, when you think of Communist cars, you don’t think of the Lada Riva or the Wartburg or that weird Chinese Austin Maestro/Montego hybrid, you think of the Trabbi!

Built in East Germany, the Trabant started production in 1957 and continued right through until the end of the Eastern Bloc in 1991! And in that entire time the car went through pretty much no modifications from its original design. This car pictured is in fact a 1988 Universal model, which looks exactly the same as a 1958 Universal!

The car has the distinction however of being the first car built out of recycled materials, although today many eco-cars can claim they were constructed from several fridges or tin cans, the Trabant was the one that perfected it. But these recycled materials were not tin cans or fridges, or any other rigid metallic materials, but was in fact recycled cotton! Cotton waste from the Soviet Union and East German dye industry was compacted into a material known as Duroplast (hard plastic), and this is what the body was made of. Although at the time this was claimed to be stronger in crashes than any Western cars of comparative size and shape, I have a strong suspicion that these tests were carried out at 3mph against a mattress!

The car was powered by a 600cc two-stroke engine for the first 30 years of its life, although for the last 4 it was powered by a Volkswagen 1.6L engine from the Polo. In total, the best part of 3.7 million Trabants were built and plied their trade along the roads of the Eastern Bloc until the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, when thousands of these cars and their owners made their way into West Germany and dispersed across Europe. Although many were abandoned within days of the crossing, the Trabbi has since become probably the most famous cult car of all time, with many Westerners picking them up in 1990 for a single Deutsche Mark.

So why would people want to buy a car that’s as slow as sin, as reliable as lighting a match in a Force 10 Gale, has the crash safety of a paper bag and the prospect of the wheels falling off at any given moment?

Novelty of course! I’ve met many Trabant collectors at car shows, and their answers have consistently been for the novelty. Be it because the car was made by a Communist regime that no longer exists, the time-capsule styling of the 1950’s on a 1990’s car, the fact that it is so unreliable and unsafe that it inspires a sense of danger and risk, or mostly because it’s something of a cultural symbol that is easily personable. Today you’ll find that a lot of Trabant’s aren’t exactly in an original guise like the one here, most have been converted into caravans, racing cars, rally cars, mock military vehicles, police …

1930 Ford Model A Deluxe Roadster (2 of 7)

1930 Ford Model A Deluxe Roadster (2 of 7)

Photographed at the Culver’s Cruise in Springfield, Illinois on July 26, 2009. The cruise is a monthly summertime event put on by the Central Illinois Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America.

****************************************************************************************************

You are invited to stay and browse through my stream. Here’s a quick introduction to my little corner of Flickr:

Automobile Photographs
: This is a very large collection of images whose primary, but not exclusive, focus is on American automotive classics. Images are organized by decade, by manufacturer, and by topics (such as convertibles, station wagons, muscle cars, etc.)

Central Illinois (excluding Springfield)
: Photos relating to the middle section of the "Land of Lincoln" (except for the Capital City of Springfield) may be found in this collection. Every city and town I’ve photographed is contained within its own set, and rural (as in "countryside") photographs are grouped by county.

Springfield, Illinois
: All of my photographs of Springfield and the Abraham Lincoln Sites are in this collection. For the City of Springfield, there are separate sets for the Capitol Complex, Downtown (including the Old State Capitol), Neighborhoods, Parks, Illinois State Fairgrounds and more. Photographs of Lincoln sites include the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Lincoln Home National Historic Site, Lincoln Tomb, and so on. Also in the Lincoln "All About Abe" (Set) are a few Lincoln sites not located in Springfield.

The Illinois State Fair
: My collection of photographs of the Illinois State Fair. The fair offers something for everyone. Grab a corn dog and lemon shake-up, and come take a look!

Beyond Central Illinois
: Other locales in the United States and Canada including New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Seattle.

In addition to my location-based sets, here are links to some "topical" collections and sets I’ve put together:

Barbers & Barber Shops
: Traditional barbers and barber shops are on the endangered species list. But there are still plenty to be found if you go looking for them.

Almost Everything Else. Check It Out!!!
: Included topics range from man’s first walk on the moon to small town schools and churches, and from Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers (our favorite breed) to things that are abandoned, neglected, weathered, or rusty.

Thanks for stopping by! – myoldpostcards (Randy von Liski)

Posted by myoldpostcards on 2009-08-25 01:35:10

Tagged: , Auto , Autos , Automobile , Motor Vehicle , Car , Cars , Antique Car , Classic Car , Old Car , Collectible Car , Vintage Car , myoldpostcards , von Liski , Ford Motor Company , FoMoCo , 1930 , Ford , Model A , Deluxe , Roadster , Convertible , Owner , Owners , Brown , Jeff Brown , Henley Brown , Megan Brown , Central Illinois Region , Antique Automobile Club of America , CIR , AACA , Drive-In , Culver’s , Cruise , Springfield , IL , Illinois , 7/26/09 , July 26, 2009 , World Cars , Grille , Front End , Nose , Chrome …

1963 Hillman Imp

1963 Hillman Imp

A car who’s name lives in British motoring infamy, a small and subtle little machine that was meant to take on the Mini, but went on to kill the Scottish Motor Industry.

The Hillman Imp was meant to be the company’s great white hope, entering production in 1963 after millions of pounds of investment, including the construction of a new factory at Linwood near Glasgow.

However, Hillman were impatient to get their car into the showrooms, and although there was a huge opening ceremony at the Linwood Factory featuring an appearance by HRH Prince Philip, Hillman had cut some corners. The Prince was only shown certain parts of the factory as most areas had not been finished, and the selection of seven cars he and his entourage were driven round in were in fact the only seven cars that would work properly.

The rest of the cars being produced were tested exhaustively by drivers hired in from the local population, basically driven until the cars wouldn’t run any more, but the distances between breakdowns were very short, some being as low as 30 miles.

Nevertheless the car was produced at the Linwood factory, which employed 6,000 people from one of the most impoverished areas of Scotland. All seemed well, until the sales numbers came in, which showed the initial problems had damaged the car’s reputation and thus resulted in it never selling the the estimated numbers. This was added to by heavy industrial action carried out by the workforce, which resulted in the factory only working at a third the capacity and suffering from many stoppages.

Because of this, the Hillman brand began to suffer, and although cars such as the Avenger, the company folded in 1976, the factory being taken over by Peugeot-Talbot. The factory continued on until 1981 and quickly demolished, resulting in high unemployment that even to this day struggles to recover.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2015-04-27 15:34:53

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , bus , truck , motor , motor vehicle , saloon , estate , compact , sports , roadster , transport , road , heritage , historic , Hillman , Hillman Imp , Imp , worldcars …

Singer 10/26 Roadster 1925 (1849)

Singer 10/26 Roadster 1925 (1849)

Manufacturer: Singer & Co Limited (Singer Motors Limited in 1936), Coventry – UK
Type: 10/26 Roadster
Engine: 1308cc straight-4
Power: 26 bhp / 3.250 rpm
Speed: 72 km/h
Production time: 1924 – 1927
Production outlet: unknown
Curb weight: 830 kg

Special:
– At the time Singer was one of the most prolific manufacturers of motorcars in the UK. By 1928 Singer was Britain’s third largest car maker after Austin and Morris.
– The 10/26 replaced the earlier Singer 10 Model and was fairly advanced for its day. It is easier to drive than many other cars of the time.
– This two-seater with dicky seat has a four-speed manual gearbox + reverse operated by gate change mechanism, a bronze Solex downdraft carburettor, a central throttle pedal, a 12-Volts electric system, odometer, oil pressure gauge, amp meter, electric starter, a 32 liter fuel tank, coil ignition system and rear wheel drive.
– The ladder-frame chassis with steel body has a 90 inch wheelbase, worm & nut steering, original cloth wiring, ROTAX (London) head lights, side lights and switch box, quarter-elliptic leaf spring front suspension, longitudinal semi-elliptic leaf spring rear suspension, standard Dunlop Cord Five Grooved 50X19” tires and mechanical drum brakes all round (1925: the first year that the Singer featured 4-wheel brakes).
– A rear luggage rack, removable side windows/curtains, side mounted spare tires and a 2-gallon "SINGER" petrol can on the running board were optional.
– Both two- and four-seater open top models (Roadster and Tourer) were available, as well as Saloon and Coupé variants.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2015-09-04 08:18:16

Tagged: , Clay , Singer & Co Limited (Singer Motors Limited in 1936), Coventry – UK , 1925 Singer 10/26 Roadster , Singer 10/26 Roadster , cs , British Car , British Convertible , Convertible , AR-50-23 , Beilen – The Netherlands , The Netherlands , Artistic impressions , Beautiful capture , Creative Impuls , Digital Creations , Fine Gold , Hairygits Elite , LOVELY FLICKR , Masters of Creative Photography , Photographic World , Roadster , The Pit Stop Shop , Wheels-Anything That Rolls , Your Best of Today , A photographers view , All types of transport , ANTICANDO!!! , Auto_Focus , BEST PEOPLE’S CHOICE , A feast for my eyes , The Machines , THE LOOK level 1 RED , Blink again , CAZADORES DE IMÁGENES , All kinds of transport , Blood sweat and gear , GEARHEADS , GREATPHOTOGRAPHERS , Cars cars and more cars , Cars cars cars , Digifoto Pro , Django’s Master , Damn cool photographers , FAIR PLAY , Friends Forever , InfiniteXposure , IQ – Image Quality , Give me 5 , Living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) , My friends pictures , PHOTOGRAPHERS , Nice as it gets , Planet Earth Transport , Planet Earth back in the day , Pro Photo , Slow ride , Showcase Images , Lovely shot , PhotoMix , Saariy’sQualityPictures , Transport of all kinds , The Red Group , Simply Because , …