1967 MG MGB

1967 MG MGB

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …

BSA Scout Series 1 1935 (9282)

BSA Scout Series 1 1935 (9282)

Manufacturer: Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA), Birmingham – UK
Type: Scout Series 1
Engine: 1021cc 9HP (RAC) straight-4 water-cooled
Power: 26 bhp / 4.000 rpm
Speed: 105 km/h
Production time: 1935 – 1936
Production time: 1935 – 1940 (all Series 1-6)
Production outlet: unknown
Curb weight: 640 kg

Special:
– These sports cars were manufactured and sold by subsidiaries of BSA, launched at April 1935.
– The body is built on a channel section steel frame and the front suspension by 8 quarter elliptic springs, the rear by semi-elliptical springs with a single brake for the front wheels (part of the differential unit) and drum brakes at the rear operated by rods.
– The engine has a so called side-valve high-efficiency detachable head block, a large diameter two bearing crankshaft, short and free from whip, mounted on ball and roller journal bearings.
– The cylinder block and crankcase are in one casting, ensuring greater rigidity and perfect alignment.
– The silent timing gearbox – silent double-helical constant mesh gears – (three forward + 1 reverse) with wide cams on a large diameter camshaft driven from crankshaft by duplex chain.
– This two seater has front wheel drive.
– The multiplate clutch has two alloy discs with cork inserts, running in oil.
– The Scouts had a 6-Volt electric system with dynamo, electric starter, coil ignition and Lucas equipment lights (a five lamp set) with dip and switch control to the head lights.

Photo taken at the Elfsteden Oldtimer Rally 2014 (Eleven Cities Oldtimer Rally 2014) nearby Hindeloopen, Friesland – The Netherlands.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2014-06-05 13:48:27

Tagged: , Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA), Birmingham – UK , BSA Scout Series 1 , cb , a feast for my eyes , auto_focus , A Photographers View , All types of transport , Artistic impressions , blinkagain , Build your rainbow , Blood, Sweat and Gear , beautiful capture , British Sports Car , Creative Photo Group , Creative impuls , Creative Artists Cafe , Cars cars and more cars , Cars Cars Cars , digifoto Pro , Django’s Master , damn cool photographers , Digital Creations , DREAMLIKE PHOTOS , Friends Forever , FotoArtCircle , Fine gold , Fan de Voitures , greatphotographers , gearheads , I like it , ineffable , In My Eyes , Love it , LOVELY FLICKR , Living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) , my_gear_and_me , Masters of Creative Photography , My Friends Pictures , MAGIC MOMENTS IN YOUR LIFE , Nice as it gets , Photographic World , PHOTOGRAPHERS , Photoshop Artists , paint creations , Photo Art , Planet Earth Transport , Planet Earth Back In The Day , SIMPLY SUPERB , PRO PHOTO , Remember that moment Level 1 , Roadster , SOE , Super Six bronze , Super Six , showroom , slow ride , Show Case , Soul O Photography , The Look Level red , The Best Shot , The Pit Stop Shop , Transport of all kinds , …

Lagonda Lean

Lagonda Lean

The Aston Martin Lagonda first entered production in 1974, and was designed to be one of the most revolutionary cars ever built, but being revolutionary was something Aston Martin should have had as far off their minds as possible!

When the car was launched, the company had just recovered from bankruptcy, and logically should have been playing things safe to try and recover their losses. But instead, what they did was design a car that was to be the cutting edge of automotive technology.

Designed by William Towns, the intention was to make a car that was so low and smoothly streamlined as was humanly possible. The result was a car that was so low that even when I was kneeling down next to this example it was still lower than me! Although such examples of cars are commonplace amongst Ferrari’s and Lamborghini’s, this car is neither, it’s a 4-door luxury limousine, not a two-door supercar!

But the problems with the Lagonda weren’t just about its low styled body, internally the car was like a substation! To try and be cutting edge, Aston Martin designed the car to be digital in every conceivable way. All readings on the Dashboard were displayed with LED’s rather than analogue needles, and everything was controlled by push-buttons, the kind you’d find on the bridge of the Starship Enterprise!

However, cutting edge does not always guarantee outright success, and the poorly made wiring inside the car meant that none of the electrics ever worked. The problem was then compounded by the fact that fitting the electrics to the car in the first place cost 4 times more than the budget of the entire car! The result was that when the first Lagonda left the factory a year late and thousands of Pounds over budget, the car was simply undrivable because of its faulty electrics.

And just to top off what could already be described as an insanely reckless car, the price tag for it was £50,000. Aston Martin were certainly being optimistic with that price tag, probably expecting to make a fortune off of their angular wonderchild. However, they had forgotten to note that there had just been an oil crisis and the idea of driving a £50,000 car powered by a gas-guzzling 5.3L V8 engine didn’t exactly ring everyone’s bells! The result was that Aston Martin only made 645 of these cars during its 16 year construction run, and not one of them made their money back!

So, Aston Martin, cash strapped and barely working, decided to make a car that had an outrageous design, outrageous electrics, an outrageous price tag and an outrageous engine, and expected to make a profit?

Today, many look back on the Lagonda as one of the most abysmal failures of automotive history, frequently popping up on ‘Worst cars ever made’ lists with other ambitious cars of that era such as the Rolls Royce Camargue. But today there is something of a cult following for these curious and crazy …

1982 Rolls Royce Camargue

1982 Rolls Royce Camargue

What you’re looking at here is the Rolls Royce Camargue, very much the Rolls Royce that time forgot. What can you even say about it? It’s one of the most iconic automotive failures in history, and certainly a car that Rolls Royce fans are always very quick to wince at when I mention it at RREC conventions.

So where did this curious car come from? To truly understand this mighty machine you need to go back to 1969, where a massive change in the image and style of the world was starting to hold sway. In the world of autos, the curvature of the 1950’s and early 60’s was giving way to the angles of the 1970’s, the decade that gave us the ‘Wedge’ sportsers and boxy saloon cars.

Rolls Royce, who at this point were building three cars, the Phantom VI, the Silver Shadow, and the Silver Shadow Two-Door Saloon (later to be known as the Corniche), were looking for a new design that would drastically alter its image from that of the Shadow. Originally, the intention was to use their new brainchild to replace the Two-Door Saloon, but due to financial difficulty within the Rolls Royce company, later followed by bankruptcy after the RB211 Jet Engine project, the company chose instead to save costs and rebrand it as the Corniche instead.

For their new car, Rolls Royce chose not to have it designed in-house like previous models, but went for the first time to Pininfarina of Italy. Throughout the remainder of 1969 the company toyed with many sketches, until in 1970 a final design was chosen and given the go by the Rolls Royce management, with the intention for a launch in either late 1972 or early 1973. Within the company, the project was dubbed "Delta", but was later changed to DY20, with ‘D’ signifying Delta, ‘Y’ signifying it was based on the SY (Silver Shadow) platform, and ’20’ shortened from 120 which was the car’s wheelbase of 120 inches.

But as mentioned, following the amount of money poured into the new Rolls Royce RB211 Jet Engine Project for the Lockheed Tristar, the company was bankrupt as of the 4th February 1971. The result was that the Motor Car Division, whose future now rested in the hands of the Official Receiver, had to look closely at all aspects of the business. This led to the splitting of the Rolls Royce company, with Rolls Royce Motors Ltd. being founded and placed under the ownership of Vickers, whilst the bankrupt Rolls Royce Ltd. was nationalised.

During this turbulent period, the DY20 project was closely scrutinised and the Receiver gave the go-ahead to commence the project, but following a critical review of the engineering specification for the car, a decision was taken to delay the launch date until 1975.

With development continuing, HJ Mulliner Park Ward, who already built the bodies for the Corniche, were chosen to manufacture the bodies of the DY20 project. In the summer of 1972, the first …

1973 MG MGB GT

1973 MG MGB GT

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …