Lotus Sunbeam S1 – Brands Hatch – Lotus Festival

Lotus Sunbeam S1 - Brands Hatch - Lotus Festival

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In order to boost Sunbeam’s image, a "hot hatch" version of the Sunbeam was launched at the 1978 British International Motor Show and Paris Motor Show, called Sunbeam Ti.[7] It was based on the former Avenger Tiger (itself hailing back to the Sunbeam Tiger), a sporty version of the Avenger. The 1.6-litre (1598cc) engine fitted to the Sunbeam with twin Weber carburetors delivered 100 bhp (75 kW; 101 PS). It featured sporty two-tone paint and body kit, and was very sport-oriented, being stripped of equipment that would compromise its performance (and image). It proved quite popular with reviewers and enthusiasts, and helped to emphasize the advantages of Sunbeam’s rear-wheel drive against more trendy (and spacious) front-wheel drive rivals.

Tony Pond driving his Talbot Sunbeam Lotus at the 1979 Manx International Rally.
Chrysler had also commissioned the sports car manufacturer and engineering company Lotus to develop a strict rally version of the Sunbeam. The resulting Sunbeam Lotus was based on the Sunbeam 1.6 GLS, but fitted with stiffer suspension, larger anti-roll bar and a larger transmission tunnel. The drivetrain comprised an enlarged 2172 cc version of the Lotus 1973 cc 907 engine, a 16V slant four engine (the Sunbeam version being type 911, similar to Lotus 912), along with a ZF gearbox, both mounted in the car at Ludham airfield close to the Lotus facility in Hethel, Norfolk, where the almost-complete cars were shipped from Linwood. Final inspection, in turn, took place in Stoke, Coventry. In road trim the Lotus type 911 engine produced 150 bhp (112 kW; 152 PS) at 5,750rpm and 150 lb·ft (203 N·m) of torque at 4,500rpm. In rallying trim this was increased to 250 bhp (186 kW; 253 PS).
The Sunbeam Lotus was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in April 1979, but the road-going version of the rally car was not actually ready for deliveries to the public until after the rebranding, and thus became the Talbot Sunbeam Lotus. At first these were produced mostly in black and silver, although later models came in a moonstone blue and silver (or black) scheme. The car saw not only enthusiastic press reviews, but also much success in the World Rally Championship – in 1980, Henri Toivonen won the 29th Lombard RAC Rally in one, and in 1981 the Sunbeam Lotus brought the entire Manufacturer Championship to Talbot.

Posted by jamesst1968 on 2012-08-18 13:32:22

Tagged: , lotus festival Brands Htach , lotus , sunbeam , cortina , mk1 , rally , kart , lotus festival Brands Hatch , www.flickr.com , news , google , yahoo , weather , flickr , photo , nude , naked

Lotus Sunbeam S2 – Brands Hatch Lotus Festival

Lotus Sunbeam S2 - Brands Hatch Lotus Festival

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www.steven-james-photographic-services.co.uk/

In order to boost Sunbeam’s image, a "hot hatch" version of the Sunbeam was launched at the 1978 British International Motor Show and Paris Motor Show, called Sunbeam Ti.[7] It was based on the former Avenger Tiger (itself hailing back to the Sunbeam Tiger), a sporty version of the Avenger. The 1.6-litre (1598cc) engine fitted to the Sunbeam with twin Weber carburetors delivered 100 bhp (75 kW; 101 PS). It featured sporty two-tone paint and body kit, and was very sport-oriented, being stripped of equipment that would compromise its performance (and image). It proved quite popular with reviewers and enthusiasts, and helped to emphasize the advantages of Sunbeam’s rear-wheel drive against more trendy (and spacious) front-wheel drive rivals.

Tony Pond driving his Talbot Sunbeam Lotus at the 1979 Manx International Rally.
Chrysler had also commissioned the sports car manufacturer and engineering company Lotus to develop a strict rally version of the Sunbeam. The resulting Sunbeam Lotus was based on the Sunbeam 1.6 GLS, but fitted with stiffer suspension, larger anti-roll bar and a larger transmission tunnel. The drivetrain comprised an enlarged 2172 cc version of the Lotus 1973 cc 907 engine, a 16V slant four engine (the Sunbeam version being type 911, similar to Lotus 912), along with a ZF gearbox, both mounted in the car at Ludham airfield close to the Lotus facility in Hethel, Norfolk, where the almost-complete cars were shipped from Linwood. Final inspection, in turn, took place in Stoke, Coventry. In road trim the Lotus type 911 engine produced 150 bhp (112 kW; 152 PS) at 5,750rpm and 150 lb·ft (203 N·m) of torque at 4,500rpm. In rallying trim this was increased to 250 bhp (186 kW; 253 PS).
The Sunbeam Lotus was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in April 1979, but the road-going version of the rally car was not actually ready for deliveries to the public until after the rebranding, and thus became the Talbot Sunbeam Lotus. At first these were produced mostly in black and silver, although later models came in a moonstone blue and silver (or black) scheme. The car saw not only enthusiastic press reviews, but also much success in the World Rally Championship – in 1980, Henri Toivonen won the 29th Lombard RAC Rally in one, and in 1981 the Sunbeam Lotus brought the entire Manufacturer Championship to Talbot.

Posted by jamesst1968 on 2012-08-18 13:31:15

Tagged: , lotus festival Brands Htach , lotus , sunbeam , cortina , mk1 , rally , kart , lotus festival Brands Hatch , www.flickr.com , news , google , yahoo , weather , flickr , photo , nude , naked …

Morgan Aero Coupe

Morgan Aero Coupe

For over 100 years the British Morgan Motor Company has been making exciting sports cars in Malvern, Worcestershire. Morgan cars are famous the world over for their unique blend of charisma, quality materials, craftsmanship and performance. All Morgan cars are coach built. One of the brands strongest selling points is the care taken in the manufacture of each car; Leading design capability, an extensive array of luxurious materials and the latest drivetrain technologies combine to create an unparalleled driving experience.

A Morgan Aero Coupe is a car that is designed to be durable with proven chemical coating and treatments of the rigid bonded chassis and body. Following research by the company on the road, the race track and in automotive laboratories the design of this versatile platform has been consistently improved and re-engineered. Now the Morgan Motor Company is a class leader in this chassis and car body technology.

Engine BMW 4799CC V8
Max Power 270kw (367/bhp)
Performance 0 – 62 4.5 seconds
Top Speed 170mph (273kph)

Posted by Roberto Braam on 2013-12-21 12:08:17

Tagged: , Morgan , Aero , Coupe , Motor , Company , British , Sports , Car , Design , Vehicle , Europe , Coach , Rain , Drops , Wet , Blue , Auto , Mobile , Hyper , Super , Exotic , Sport , Vehikel , Voiture , Anglaise , Nikon , D5100 , Image , Capture , Photo , Europa , World , Classic , Retro , Spotting , Zoute , Knokke , Heist , Rally , Grand , Prix , BE , Belgium , België , Roberto Braam , 2013 , Event , Model , Exclusive …

Escort on the mountain

Escort on the mountain

September 2013 "Mont Blanc Rally".

The Ford Escort:

The squarer-styled Mark II version appeared in January 1975. The first production models had rolled off the production lines on 2nd December 1974.

Unlike the first Escort (which was developed by Ford of Britain), the second generation was developed jointly between the UK and Ford of Germany. Codenamed "Brenda" during its development, it used the same mechanical components as the Mark I. The 950 cc engine was still offered in Italy where the smaller engine attracted tax advantages, but in the other larger European markets in Europe it was unavailable. The estate and van versions used the same panelwork as the Mark I, but with the Mark II front end and interior. The car used a revised underbody, which had been introduced as a running change during the last six months production of the Mark I. Rear suspension still sat on leaf springs though some contemporaries such as the Hillman Avenger had moved on to coil springs.

The "L" and "GL" models (2-door, 4-door, estate) were in the mainstream private sector, the "Sport", "RSMexico", and "RS2000" in the performance market, the "Ghia" (2-door, 4-door) for an untapped small car luxury market, and "base / Popular" models for the bottom end. Panel-van versions catered to the commercial sector.

A cosmetic update was given in 1978, with L models gaining the square headlights (previously exclusive to the GL and Ghia variants) and there was an upgrade in interior and exterior specification for some models. Underneath a wider front track was given.

In 1979 and 1980 three special edition Escorts were launched the Linnet, Harrier and Goldcrest.

Production ended in Britain in August 1980, other countries following soon after.

As with its predecessor, the Mark II had a successful rallying career. All models of the Mark I were carried over to the Mark II, though the Mexico gained the RS badge and had its engine changed to a 1.6 L OHC Pinto instead of the OHV. A "Sport" model was also produced using the 1.6 L Kent. A new model was released, the RS1800, which had a fuel injected 1790 cc Cosworth BDE engine. It was essentially a special created for rallying.

The works rally cars were highly specialised machines. Bodyshells were heavily strengthened. They were characterised by the wide wheelarch extensions, and often by the fitment of four large spotlights for night stages. The Cosworth BDE engine was replaced with 2.0 L BDG and gave up to 250 bhp (186 kW; 253 PS) by 1979. It was complemented by a strengthened transmission, five-speed straight-cut ZF gearbox, five-linked suspension and more minor modifications.

The Mark II Escort continued its predecessor’s run on the RAC Rally, winning every year from 1975 to 1979 and racing in a variety of other events around the world. In the 1979 season of the World Rally Championship, Björn Waldegård took the drivers’ title, Hannu Mikkola was runner-up and Ari Vatanen finished the year in fifth place, all driving Escort RS1800s.…