Warrior Wednesday: Marine from Duluth, Minnesota

Warrior Wednesday: Marine from Duluth, Minnesota

Corporal Carl Provost, automotive mechanic, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, shaves Lance Cpl. Lukasz Wlodkowski, automotive maintenance technician, Combat Logistics Battalion 5, at his home aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif. June 8, 2014. Provost is from Duluth, Minn.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Anna Albrecht

Watch video: youtu.be/QWWQgjWgvHM

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Posted by 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit on 2014-06-11 02:21:36

Tagged: , 15th MEU , 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit , Public Affairs , Marine Corps , Marines , Marine , Marine Expeditionary Unit , Marine Air-Ground Task Force , MAGTF , Sailor , Sailors , Navy , USMC , United States Marine Corps , Military , CE , Command Element , Motor transportation , Motor-T , automotive mechanic , corporal , Cpl. Carl Provost , Warrior Wednesday , Duluth , Minnesota , MN , shaving , art , barber , straight razor , shave , Camp Pendleton , California , Wednesday , Wed , Warrior , barbers …

Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be a popular aircraft, with approximately 55 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums all over the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell designed the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. However, because of its higher performance, Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved, sometimes dramatically, over the course of its life.

Mk V (Types 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Group Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the wide bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and "clipped" wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber series over Britain would be the start of a new sustained high altitude bombing offensive by the Luftwaffe, in which case development was put in hand for a pressurised version of the Spitfire, with a new version of the Merlin (the Mk VI). It would take …

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be a popular aircraft, with approximately 55 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums all over the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell designed the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. However, because of its higher performance, Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved, sometimes dramatically, over the course of its life.

Mk V (Types 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Group Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the wide bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and "clipped" wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber series over Britain would be the start of a new sustained high altitude bombing offensive by the Luftwaffe, in which case development was put in hand for a pressurised version of the Spitfire, with a new version of the Merlin (the Mk VI). It would take …

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941) and Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941) and Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British one-seat fighter plane that was used by the Royal Air Power and a lot of other Allied nations for the duration of and just after the Next World War. The Spitfire was created in a lot of variants, employing many wing configurations, and was created in bigger quantities than any other British plane. It was also the only British fighter to be in continual output through the war. The Spitfire continues to be a well-liked plane, with somewhere around fifty five Spitfires staying airworthy, even though a lot of extra are static exhibits in aviation museums all more than the planet.

The Spitfire was developed as a small-selection, superior-efficiency interceptor plane by R. J. Mitchell, main designer at Supermarine Aviation Is effective (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its function as an interceptor, Mitchell developed the Spitfire’s distinct elliptical wing to have the thinnest achievable cross-part this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a larger prime pace than many modern fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the style and design till his dying from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took more than as main designer, overseeing the enhancement of the Spitfire by its multitude of variants.

For the duration of the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the general public to be the RAF fighter, although the extra several Hawker Hurricane shouldered a bigger proportion of the stress from the Luftwaffe. Having said that, because of its larger efficiency, Spitfire units experienced a decrease attrition rate and a larger victory-to-loss ratio than these traveling Hurricanes.

Just after the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire outdated the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and observed action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. A lot cherished by its pilots, the Spitfire served in many roles, including interceptor, photograph-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and coach, and it continued to serve in these roles till the 1950s. The Seafire was a provider-primarily based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 by to the mid-1950s. While the authentic airframe was developed to be run by a Rolls-Royce Merlin motor generating 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong ample and adaptable ample to use progressively strong Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines generating up to two,340 hp (1,745 kW) as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s efficiency and capabilities improved, sometimes considerably, more than the training course of its life.

Mk V (Sorts 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Team Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the huge bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and “clipped” wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber sequence more than Britain would be the commence of a new sustained superior altitude bombing offensive by …