1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car front right

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car front right

MG Cars is a former British sports car manufacturer, which was founded in 1924, the creator of the MG brand.
MG Cars is best known for its two-seat open sports cars, but MG also produced saloons and coupés. More recently, the MG marque has also been used on sportier versions of other models belonging to the parent company.
The MG marque was in continuous use (barring the years of the Second World War) for 56 years after its inception. Production of predominantly two-seater sports cars was concentrated at a factory in Abingdon, some 10 miles (16 km) south of Oxford. The British Motor Corporation (BMC) competition department was also based at the Abingdon plant and produced many winning rally and race cars. In the autumn of 1980, however, the Abingdon factory closed and MGB production ceased.
The MG TA replaced the PB in 1936. It was an evolution of the previous car and was 3 inches (76 mm) wider in its track at 45 inches and 7 inches (180 mm) longer in its wheelbase at 94 inches. The previous advanced overhead cam engine was now not in use by any other production car so it was replaced by a more typical MPJG OHV unit from the Wolseley 10 but with twin SU carburettors, modified camshaft and manifolding. The engine displaced just 1292 cc, with a stroke of 102 mm and a bore of 63.5 mm and power output was 50 hp (40.3 kW) at 4500 rpm. The four speed manual gearbox now had synchromesh on the two top ratios. Like the PB, most were two seat open cars with a steel body on an ash frame but it could also be had from 1938 as a Tickford drophead coupé with body by Salmsons of Newport Pagnell or closed "airline" coupé as fitted to the P type but only one of these is thought to have been made. It was capable of reaching nearly 80 mph (130 km/h) in standard tune with a 0-60 mph time of 23.1 seconds. Unlike the PB, hydraulic brakes were fitted. Just over 3000 were made and in 1936 it cost £222 on the home market.
The TA was replaced by the TB in May 1939 with the fitting of a smaller but more modern XPAG engine as fitted to the Morris 10 but in a higher tuned state and like the TA with twin SU carburettors. This 1250 cc I4 unit featured a slightly less-undersquare 66.6 mm bore and 90 mm stroke and had a maximum power output of 54 hp (40 kW) at 5200 rpm. Available as either an open 2 seater or more luxurious Tickford drophead coupé, this is the rarest of the T type cars with only 379 made.
On the eve of the war, MG had offered the TB model which, with a few modifications was to become the first post-war MG, the TC Midget. The chassis of the new car was essentially the same as before, but the sliding trunnion …

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car rear right

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car rear right

MG Cars is a former British sports car manufacturer, which was founded in 1924, the creator of the MG brand.
MG Cars is best known for its two-seat open sports cars, but MG also produced saloons and coupés. More recently, the MG marque has also been used on sportier versions of other models belonging to the parent company.
The MG marque was in continuous use (barring the years of the Second World War) for 56 years after its inception. Production of predominantly two-seater sports cars was concentrated at a factory in Abingdon, some 10 miles (16 km) south of Oxford. The British Motor Corporation (BMC) competition department was also based at the Abingdon plant and produced many winning rally and race cars. In the autumn of 1980, however, the Abingdon factory closed and MGB production ceased.
The MG TA replaced the PB in 1936. It was an evolution of the previous car and was 3 inches (76 mm) wider in its track at 45 inches and 7 inches (180 mm) longer in its wheelbase at 94 inches. The previous advanced overhead cam engine was now not in use by any other production car so it was replaced by a more typical MPJG OHV unit from the Wolseley 10 but with twin SU carburettors, modified camshaft and manifolding. The engine displaced just 1292 cc, with a stroke of 102 mm and a bore of 63.5 mm and power output was 50 hp (40.3 kW) at 4500 rpm. The four speed manual gearbox now had synchromesh on the two top ratios. Like the PB, most were two seat open cars with a steel body on an ash frame but it could also be had from 1938 as a Tickford drophead coupé with body by Salmsons of Newport Pagnell or closed "airline" coupé as fitted to the P type but only one of these is thought to have been made. It was capable of reaching nearly 80 mph (130 km/h) in standard tune with a 0-60 mph time of 23.1 seconds. Unlike the PB, hydraulic brakes were fitted. Just over 3000 were made and in 1936 it cost £222 on the home market.
The TA was replaced by the TB in May 1939 with the fitting of a smaller but more modern XPAG engine as fitted to the Morris 10 but in a higher tuned state and like the TA with twin SU carburettors. This 1250 cc I4 unit featured a slightly less-undersquare 66.6 mm bore and 90 mm stroke and had a maximum power output of 54 hp (40 kW) at 5200 rpm. Available as either an open 2 seater or more luxurious Tickford drophead coupé, this is the rarest of the T type cars with only 379 made.
On the eve of the war, MG had offered the TB model which, with a few modifications was to become the first post-war MG, the TC Midget. The chassis of the new car was essentially the same as before, but the sliding trunnion …

1971 MG MGB GT

1971 MG MGB GT

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car 31

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car 31

MG Cars is a former British sports car manufacturer, which was founded in 1924, the creator of the MG brand.
MG Cars is best known for its two-seat open sports cars, but MG also produced saloons and coupés. More recently, the MG marque has also been used on sportier versions of other models belonging to the parent company.
The MG marque was in continuous use (barring the years of the Second World War) for 56 years after its inception. Production of predominantly two-seater sports cars was concentrated at a factory in Abingdon, some 10 miles (16 km) south of Oxford. The British Motor Corporation (BMC) competition department was also based at the Abingdon plant and produced many winning rally and race cars. In the autumn of 1980, however, the Abingdon factory closed and MGB production ceased.
The MG TA replaced the PB in 1936. It was an evolution of the previous car and was 3 inches (76 mm) wider in its track at 45 inches and 7 inches (180 mm) longer in its wheelbase at 94 inches. The previous advanced overhead cam engine was now not in use by any other production car so it was replaced by a more typical MPJG OHV unit from the Wolseley 10 but with twin SU carburettors, modified camshaft and manifolding. The engine displaced just 1292 cc, with a stroke of 102 mm and a bore of 63.5 mm and power output was 50 hp (40.3 kW) at 4500 rpm. The four speed manual gearbox now had synchromesh on the two top ratios. Like the PB, most were two seat open cars with a steel body on an ash frame but it could also be had from 1938 as a Tickford drophead coupé with body by Salmsons of Newport Pagnell or closed "airline" coupé as fitted to the P type but only one of these is thought to have been made. It was capable of reaching nearly 80 mph (130 km/h) in standard tune with a 0-60 mph time of 23.1 seconds. Unlike the PB, hydraulic brakes were fitted. Just over 3000 were made and in 1936 it cost £222 on the home market.
The TA was replaced by the TB in May 1939 with the fitting of a smaller but more modern XPAG engine as fitted to the Morris 10 but in a higher tuned state and like the TA with twin SU carburettors. This 1250 cc I4 unit featured a slightly less-undersquare 66.6 mm bore and 90 mm stroke and had a maximum power output of 54 hp (40 kW) at 5200 rpm. Available as either an open 2 seater or more luxurious Tickford drophead coupé, this is the rarest of the T type cars with only 379 made.
On the eve of the war, MG had offered the TB model which, with a few modifications was to become the first post-war MG, the TC Midget. The chassis of the new car was essentially the same as before, but the sliding trunnion …

1972 MG Midget

1972 MG Midget

Much like the MGB, the Midget was the past of the great athletics cars of the 1960’s, getting built ideal up until finally 1980, but in the exact unhappy twist as the MGB, resulted in it getting deprived of its looks, its dignity and its glory.

But the Midget would increase once more!

The primary MG Midget began generation in 1961, getting for all intents and applications a a bit much more costly badge-engineered variation of the Austin-Healey Sprite MKII, and retained the quarter-elliptic sprung rear axle from the primary Sprite. Ability came from a 46hp BMC A-Collection engine that was fitted with twin SU carburettors. The vehicle came with a difficult major, heater, radio and baggage rack. In October 1962, the engine was retuned to increase power to 56hp, and the primary drum brakes ended up changed with discs. Major speed was 88mph, and -60 was achievable in a thoughts-blowing 18.3 seconds! In all, the vehicle price £689 and ran at a consumption of 40mpg, which is just not too lousy, despite the fact that with these outstanding speeds at the driver’s command 40 miles could be a lengthy time!

On the other hand, in a bizarre twist, the doors had no exterior handles or locks, and the windows ended up sliding Perspex side-screens. I can’t give the early Midgets any factors for basic safety then!

In 1964, the MkII was released with a variety of exterior variations, such as wind-up windows, swivelling quarter lights, exterior handles and different locks. The windscreen also acquired a slight curvature and was retained in a much more significant frame. The hood, even though modified, ongoing to have a removable frame that had to be erected right before the include was set on. The rear springs ended up changed by much more standard semi-elliptic styles which gave a much better experience. The engine block was strengthened and bigger most important bearings ended up fitted, growing the power to 59hp.

For the MkIII, the engine was upped to a 65hp variation of the A-Collection engine made use of in the racing Mini-Cooper S. This came as a stage of competition for supporters as the primary sporty engine in the Mini-Cooper could produce 76hp, and had been intentionally tuned down for the Midget. The detuned engine was made use of for causes of model variety placement – with the Cooper ‘S’ spec engine the Midget would have been more quickly than the much more costly MGB.

In late 1967, US-spec cars been given many basic safety additions, such as a padded dashboard with smaller sized most important gauges, collapsible steering column, scissor-kind hood hinges, a third windshield wiper, further side marker lights, and anti-burst doorway latches. There ended up insignificant facelift variations to the system trim in late 1969, with the sills painted black, a revised recessed black grille, and squared off taillights as on the MGB.

On the other hand, points swiftly went improper for the Midget, with challenges beginning with the development of …