ROAD TESTING THE MERCEDES BENZ 220 SE SALOON 1961

ROAD TESTING THE MERCEDES BENZ 220 SE SALOON 1961

BY JOHN B. BALL – ILLUSTRATED BRISTOL NEWS.

THE NEW STYLED larger Mercedes 220 SE was first seen in this country at the 1959 Motor Show. It was, however, some time after this before we began to see this vehicle on the home market, and despite the fact that greater production has considerably cut down the waiting period, there is still a very great demand for this German de luxe car.

The 220 SE is the only production car in the world which offers fuel injection. To the uninformed, this really means that the carburettors are completely replaced by a fuel pump which injects petrol into the combustion chamber. The main advantage of this, of course, is that the injection timing is always perfect, and varies in relation to the speed of the engine. This not only gives perfectly smooth running, but also increases the brake horsepower of the engine, and gives a better and more balanced fuel consumption.

The exterior line of this Mercedes is dignified and elegant, and although it gives an impression of power and speed, could not under any circumstances be called ‘rakish’. It is six inches longer than its predecessor, and with an overall length of over 16 ft. must certainly be classed as a ‘big’ car. Upon entering the saloon, one must be impressed by the amount of passenger space available. In the front, two semi-bucket type seats give maximum comfort to the driver and passenger, whilst a broad armrest will fold away and with the insertion of a cushion, a third person can be taken as an occasional passenger. In the rear, three fully grown people could be accommodated in complete comfort without any crowding.

The leather upholstered seats are firmly comfortable, and the standard of trim and saloon fittings is extremely high. At the front, however, I was not at all impressed by the dashboard and facia. Although at first glance it looked extremely attractive, having a padded leather head and foot, the centre itself is almost completely dominated by the heater and demister controls.

The most important instruments are enclosed in what I consider to be a particularly cluttered cowl, which is seen through the steering wheel, but even this view is broken by the inner horn ring. This, I feel, is a particularly bad mistake, for in the normal driving position I found that I could not take a full reading of my instruments without close scrutiny, which, of course, must surely be a very bad point. The foot controls and hand-brake are nicely placed, as are the hand instruments and indicator controls. Mercedes have, in the past, no doubt due to their racing successes, been accredited with excellent performances, and in the acceleration field the 220 SE is no exception.

I found it was possible to go from a standing start to 50 m.p.h. in as little as six seconds, and a standing start to 60 m.p.h. (using only three gears) in 10.2 seconds. Maximum speed, which on the …

Mercedes-Benz C111 Concept

Mercedes-Benz C111 Concept

The compact wedge in bright orange, a shade internally called weissherbst, expressed power, elegance and speed. C 111 was the designation of the futuristic study displayed by Mercedes-Benz in September 1969 at the Frankfurt International Motor Show (IAA). The car broke new ground in terms of both engineering and design. Motor show visitors crowded around the sports car, marveling at its intriguing design. Was this the worthy successor to the famous 300 SL Gullwing? The car’s style, dynamic lines and classic gullwing doors promised just that to lovers of refined cars with the three-pointed star on the hood. This happened 35 years ago, at the C 111’s presentation in Frankfurt. In the spring of 1970, an even more elegantly clad C 111-II made its appearance at the Geneva Motor Show, prompting interested parties to send blank checks to Stuttgart to secure one of these cars for themselves.

Neither the C111-II or C 111 did not to appear in showrooms despite their lavish interior and cargo space. The coupes may have looked production worthy, but complex technologies embedded within in the cars kept them as experimental cars. However, the research in testing Wankel engines, new suspension components and plastic bodywork components contributed to future Mercedes-Benz road cars.

The three-rotor Wankel engine in the first C 111 of 1969 developed 206 kW/ 280 hp, giving the car a top speed of around 260 km/h. The newcomer set out on its first tests in Unterturkheim, on the Hockenheimring and the Nurburgring in April and May 1969. The suspension featured anti-squat and anti-dive control; its front axle components were incorporated in large-scale production at a later stage and the rear axle was a precursor of today’s multi-link independent rear suspension. On the basis of the experience gained in testing this car, another five experimental cars were built.

From Wankel to Diesel
An exceptional feature of the C 111 was hidden under its skin. The first experimental car of 1969 was powered not by a reciprocating-piston engine but by a Wankel – or rotary – engine. At the time, many manufacturers were interested in Felix Wankel’s unconventional propulsion system. Mercedes-Benz, too, had been experimenting with Wankel engines since 1962. However, the Wankel engine had to be extensively road-tested before being fitted in production cars.

The engines of the first two C 111 versions were straightforward gas-guzzlers. And since the pollutant content in the exhaust gas of the Wankel engines was also too high, Mercedes-Benz discontinued work on this type of engine in 1971, in spite of its impressively smooth running characteristics and compact size.The last Mercedes with a rotary-piston engine from this series was the four-rotor DB M950 KE409 of the C 111-II in 1970. Subsequent versions of the C111 project were powered by a diesel engine. They quite successfully showcased Mercedes-Benz’s prowess by breaking many world records.

[Text from Supercars.net]

Read more at www.supercars.net/cars/3015.html#YWhiHErEpHHjWgQ0.99

This Lego miniland-scale Mercedes-Benz C111 has been created for Flickr LUGNuts’ 84th build challenge, our 7th birthday, to the theme, …

Mercedes 300 Cabriolet D – 1953

Mercedes 300 Cabriolet D - 1953

W186

‘A Continental test on a (Mercedes-Benz 300) production model recently made available by the manufacturers shows that the car now challenges the best produced anywhere in the world today. There are still very few saloon cars which are capable of a mean speed of over 100mph, but to obtain this result on a five/six-seater saloon car with generous room for passengers and luggage, using an engine of three-litre capacity said to deliver only 114 bhp, is a notable achievement.’ – The Autocar magazine, May 1952.

Introduced at the Frankfurt Auto Show in 1951, the Mercedes-Benz 300 owed the design of its independently suspended oval-tube chassis to the 170S of 1949 and would later on provide the mechanical basis for the incomparable 300 SL sports car. Additional refinements appropriate for the company’s top-of-the-range luxury saloon included an improved steering mechanism and remote electrical control of the rear suspension ride height. Initially developing 115 bhp (DIN), the 3-litre, overhead-camshaft six-cylinder engine was increased in power for succeeding models, producing 125 bhp in the 300b built between March 1954 and August 1955. Other improvements included larger brakes (with servo-assistance from 1954) optional power steering and three-speed automatic transmission as standard on the 300d. Conservatively styled, the Mercedes-Benz 300 was one of very few contemporary vehicles capable of carrying six passengers in comfort at sustained high speeds. Priced at DM 24.700 in 1954, the 300b Cabriolet D was among the world’s most expensive – if not the most expensive – automobiles of its day.

‘To the characteristics of high performance, impressive appearance and fine detail finish which distinguished the big Mercedes models of pre-war days are added new virtues of silence, flexibility and lightness of control, while the latest rear suspension, a product of long experience on Grand Prix cars and touring cars, confers a degree of security at high speeds on rough and slippery surfaces which it would be very difficult indeed to equal,’ observed The Autocar.

A most worthy upholder of the Grosser Mercedes tradition of pre-war years, this rare Cabriolet D is one of only 181 of its type built on the 300/300b chassis during 1953 out of a total convertible production of 591. The car was purchased from Kansas, USA in 2001 and brought to Spain where it was professionally restored from the ground upwards – with no expense spared and using original Mercedes-Benz parts – by Moret Clásicos of Villalba, Madrid. The total cost was at least € 90.000.

There is a detailed estimate in the accompanying file, which also contains a US title, shipping documentation, Spanish registration papers, and photographs of the restoration. Following completion in 2004, the car was exhibited at Techno Classica Essen. Only some 1.500 kilometres have been covered since the rebuild and this beautiful Mercedes-Benz soft-top remains in commensurately excellent condition.

Les Grandes Marques du Monde au Grand Palais
Bonhams
Sold for € 149.500
Estimated : € 130.000 – 150.000

Parijs – Paris
Frankrijk – France
February 2017

Posted by Perico001 on 2017-02-21 …

1949 – 1952 Mercedes-Benz 170 S Limousine

1949 - 1952 Mercedes-Benz 170 S Limousine

See more car pics on my facebook page!

The Mercedes-Benz W136 was Mercedes-Benz’s line of four-cylinder automobiles from the mid-1930s into the 1950s. The car was first presented in public in February 1936, although by that time production had already been under way for a couple of months. Between 1936 and 1939, and again between 1947 and 1953 it was the manufacturer’s top selling automobile.

After the Second World War the W136 became the foundation on which the company rebuilt, because enough of the tooling had survived allied bombing or could be recreated.

1949 saw the arrival of the Mercedes-Benz 170S version of the W136. This model is in retrospect sometimes celebrated as the first S-Class Mercedes-Benz. It was a more luxurious, costlier and, when launched, slightly larger version of the mainstream model and the manufacturer made an effort to maximize the differentiation between the two. The Mercedes-Benz 170 Sb and 170 DS were even given a different works number in 1952, being internally designated between 1952 and 1953 as the Mercedes-Benz W191.

1955 was the car’s last year of production. Its replacement, the W120 had already been on sale since July 1953, after which the older model was repositioned in the market as a lower priced alternative to the new one.

The Mercedes-Benz 170 SV and 170 SD were also built briefly in Argentina from 1952-1955 in sedan, taxi, pick-up and van versions.

(Wikipedia)

Posted by Georg Sander on 2014-06-13 05:29:09

Tagged: , 1949 , 1952 , Mercedes-Benz , 170 , S , Limousine , Mercedes , Benz , 170S , Sedan , Saloon , blue , blau , alt , old , auto , automobil , automobile , autos , bild , bilder , car , cars , classic , foto , fotos , image , images , mobil , oldtimer , photo , photos , picture , pictures , vehicle , wallpaper …

1936 – 1942 Mercedes-Benz 170 V Cabriolet A and 1938 Horch 853 Cabriolet A

1936 - 1942 Mercedes-Benz 170 V Cabriolet A and 1938 Horch 853 Cabriolet A

See more car pics on my facebook page!

– – –

The Mercedes-Benz W136 was Mercedes-Benz’s line of four-cylinder automobiles from the mid-1930s into the 1950s. The car was first presented in public in February 1936, although by that time production had already been under way for a couple of months. Between 1936 and 1939, and again between 1947 and 1953 it was the manufacturer’s top selling automobile.

After the Second World War the W136 became the foundation on which the company rebuilt, because enough of the tooling had survived allied bombing or could be recreated.

1949 saw the arrival of the Mercedes-Benz 170S version of the W136. This model is in retrospect sometimes celebrated as the first S-Class Mercedes-Benz. It was a more luxurious, costlier and, when launched, slightly larger version of the mainstream model and the manufacturer made an effort to maximize the differentiation between the two. The Mercedes-Benz 170 Sb and 170 DS were even given a different works number in 1952, being internally designated between 1952 and 1953 as the Mercedes-Benz W191.

1955 was the car’s last year of production. Its replacement, the W120 had already been on sale since July 1953, after which the older model was repositioned in the market as a lower priced alternative to the new one.

The Mercedes-Benz 170 SV and 170 SD were also built briefly in Argentina from 1952-1955 in sedan, taxi, pick-up and van versions.

(Wikipedia)

Posted by Georg Sander on 2015-03-06 08:09:37

Tagged: , 1936 , 1942 , Mercedes-Benz , 170 , V , Cabriolet , A , Mercedes , Benz , Cabrio , Convertible , 170V , alt , old , auto , automobil , automobile , autos , bild , bilder , car , cars , classic , foto , fotos , image , images , mobil , oldtimer , photo , photos , picture , pictures , vehicle , wallpaper , Mark , Mk , Series , Serie , Generation , Type , Typ , liter , litre …