1965 MG MGB

1965 MG MGB

Oh the MGB, the last great British Sports car?

A motor that refused to die even though British Leyland simply couldn’t stop messing around with it. The MGB is an example of a car that went from one of the most loved and lovable cars in British motoring, to what many describe as an empty husk broken and bent for legislation purposes. But the MGB would have its way in the end!

The story behind the MGB begins in 1962, when the car was designed to incorporate an innovative, modern style utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB’s rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver’s compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.

The car was powered by a BMC B-Series engine, producing 95hp and giving the car a 0-60 of 11 seconds, perhaps not the briskest acceleration, but of course this car was more a comfy little cruiser, ambling about the countryside in sedate fashion admiring the views. The MGB was also one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).

The roadster was the first of the MGB range to be produced. The body was a pure two-seater but a small rear seat was a rare option at one point. By making better use of space the MGB was able to offer more passenger and luggage accommodation than the earlier MGA while 3 inches shorter overall. The suspension was also softer, giving a smoother ride, and the larger engine gave a slightly higher top speed. The four-speed gearbox was an uprated version of the one used in the MGA with an optional (electrically activated) overdrive transmission. Wheel diameter dropped from 15 to 14 inches.

Upon its launch the MGB was given almost unanimous acclaim, largely due to its advanced and innovative design combined with its beautifully and sleek styling. Previous sports cars of the same calibre had always been levied with a reputation for their ropey nature, with a majority of previous models being simply remodelled versions of the MG’s and Triumphs that dated back to the end of and in some cases even before World War II. But the MG was different, and if I’m honest, a large part of its appeal is due to its small, low body, and it’s poky round headlights that make it look rather cute. It’s the kind of car you could give a name, preferably a girl’s one. Either way, the MGB sold in hundreds, disappearing off to all corners of the globe, touring the South of France, storming across the deserts …

1959 Cadillac Coupe De Ville left

1959 Cadillac Coupe De Ville left

Cadillac is a luxury vehicle marque owned by General Motors Company. Cadillac vehicles are sold in over 50 countries and territories, but mainly in North America.
Cadillac is currently the oldest American automobile manufacturer and among the oldest automobile brands in the world. Founded in 1902 as the Cadillac Automobile Company, it was purchased in 1909 by General Motors and over the next 30 years established itself as America’s premier luxury car. Cadillac pioneered many accessories in automobiles, including full electrical systems, the clashless manual transmission and the steel roof. The brand developed three engines, one of which (the V8) set the standard for the American automotive industry.
Cadillac was purchased by the General Motors (GM) conglomerate in 1909. Cadillac became General Motors’ prestige division, devoted to the production of large luxury vehicles. The Cadillac line was also GM’s default marque for "commercial chassis" institutional vehicles, such as limousines, ambulances, hearses and funeral home flower cars, the last three of which were custom-built by aftermarket manufacturers. Cadillac does not produce any such vehicles in their factory.
In July 1917, the United States Army needed a dependable staff car and chose the Cadillac Type 55 Touring Model after exhaustive tests on the Mexican border. Two thousand three hundred fifty of the cars were supplied for use in France by officers of the American Expeditionary Force during World War I.[5]
Pre-World War II Cadillacs were well-built, powerful, mass-produced luxury cars aimed at an upper class market. In the 1930s, Cadillac added cars with V12 and V16 engines to their range, many of which were fitted with custom coach-built bodies; these engines were remarkable at the time for their ability to deliver a combination of high power, silky smoothness and quietness.
Automobile stylist Harley Earl, whom Cadillac had recruited in 1926 and who was to head the new Art and Color section starting in January 1928, designed for 1927 a new, smaller "companion" car to the Cadillac which he called the La Salle, after another French explorer, René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. That marque remained in production until 1940.

The Coupe deVille (sometimes spelled Coupe Deville or Coupe DeVille) was a model of Cadillac from 1949 through 1993.
The Coupe deVille was introduced by Cadillac late in the 1949 model year. Part of the Cadillac Series 62 line, it was a closed, two-door coupé, Cadillac’s first pillarless hardtop. Intended as a prestige model, at $3,497 it was one of the most expensive models of the Series 62 line. It was luxuriously trimmed, with leather upholstery and chrome ‘bows’ in the headliner to simulate the ribs of a convertible top. The first-year Coupe deVille sold 2,150 units, but 1950 sales were more than double, and 1951 more than doubled those of the previous year. By 1961 it was one of the company’s most popular models, with annual sales above 20,000.
Cadillac De Ville nomenclature always followed a tradition: Two doors with steel roofs were always Coupe De Ville, four doors were always …

1937 – 1938 Škoda Popular OHV (01)

1937 - 1938 Škoda Popular OHV (01)

Škoda is an automobile manufacturer based in the Czech Republic. Škoda became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Volkswagen Group in 2000, positioned as the entry brand to the group. Its total global sales reached 684,226 cars in 2009 and 85,000 for the month of March 2011.

(Wikipedia)

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Der Škoda Popular war der Nachfolger des Škoda 420 Popular. Der zweitürige Kleinwagen kam 1937 mit Limousinen- und Roadster-Karosserien in Holz-/Stahlmischkonstruktion heraus.

(Wikipedia)

Posted by Georg Sander on 2012-03-25 12:45:48

Tagged: , 1937 , 1938 , Škoda , Popular , OHV , skoda , alt , antique , auto , automobil , automobile , autos , bild , bilder , car , cars , classic , classique , foto , fotos , historic , image , images , klasik , mobil , old , oldtimer , photo , photos , picture , pictures , vehicle , vintage , wallpaper , 2012 , Technoclassica , Techno , classica , Motorshow , Motor , Show , Messe , Automesse , Oldtimermesse , Essen , Germany …

Canadian Automotive Museum (Oshawa, Ontario)

Canadian Automotive Museum (Oshawa, Ontario)

Shown: 1928 Bugatti Type 35

Automobiles Ettore Bugatti was a French car manufacturer of high-performance automobiles, founded in 1909 in the then German city of Molsheim, Alsace by Italian-born Ettore Bugatti. Bugatti cars were known for their design beauty (Ettore Bugatti was from a family of artists and considered himself to be both an artist and constructor[clarification needed]) and for their many race victories. Famous Bugattis include the Type 35 Grand Prix cars, the Type 41 "Royale", the Type 57 "Atlantic" and the Type 55 sports car. The death of Ettore Bugatti in 1947 proved to be the end for the marque, and the death of his son Jean Bugatti in 1939 ensured there was not a successor to lead the factory. No more than about 8,000 cars were made. The company struggled financially, and released one last model in the 1950s, before eventually being purchased for its airplane parts business in the 1960s. In the 1990s, an Italian entrepreneur revived it as a builder of limited production exclusive sports cars. Today, the name is owned by German automobile manufacturing group Volkswagen. [Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti]

The Type 35 was the most successful of the Bugatti racing models. Its version of the Bugatti arch-shaped radiator that had evolved from the more architectural one of the Bugatti Type 13 Brescia, was to become the one that the marque is most known for though even in the ranks of the various Type 35s there were variations on the theme. The Type 35 was phenomenally successful, winning over 1,000 races in its time. It took the Grand Prix World Championship in 1926 after winning 351 races and setting 47 records in the two prior years. At its height, Type 35s averaged 14 race wins per week. Bugatti won the Targa Florio for five consecutive years, from 1925 through 1929, with the Type 35. [Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti_Type_35#Type_35]

The Canadian Automotive Museum is an automobile museum located in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. The museum features many Canadian-made cars as the automobile industry, specifically the Canadian division of the General Motors, known as General Motors Canada, which has always been at the forefront of Oshawa’s economy. The museum was founded in 1962 by a group of Oshawa businessmen through the Oshawa Chamber of Commerce. The venture was initiated mainly to preserve the automotive history of Canada and to present this history in an educational and entertaining manner. Canadian Automotive Museum Inc is a charitable corporation and has been in operation since 1963. The museum is housed in a 25,000 sq ft (2,300 m2) building in downtown Oshawa that was originally the location of Ontario Motor Sales, a local car dealership, in the 1920s. The building maintains its original period architecture right down to the original elevator used to move cars to the second floor. The Museum is affiliated with: CMA, CHIN, and Virtual Museum of Canada. [Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Automotive_Museum]
Website: www.canadianautomotivemuseum.com

This "Canadian Automotive Museum" tells the story of the ‘Canadian Automotive Industry’ through its many displays and original artifacts. It …

1936 – 1937 Škoda Sagitta Prototyp (Typ 911) (02)

1936 - 1937 Škoda Sagitta Prototyp (Typ 911) (02)

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Škoda Auto (Czech pronunciation: [ˈʃkoda]) was established as an arms manufacturer in 1859. Today, Škoda is an automobile manufacturer based in the Czech Republic. Škoda became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Volkswagen Group in 2000, positioned as the entry brand to the group. Its total global sales reached 684,226 cars in 2009 and 85,000 for the month of March 2011.

(Wikipedia)

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Der Škoda Sagitta war ein Kleinwagen-Prototyp des tschechoslowakischen Herstellers Škoda. Die in Holz-Stahl-Mischkonstruktion gefertigte Karosserie ähnelte der des Škoda Popular. Das Fahrzeug wurde 1937 hergestellt. Es kam nie zu einer Serienfertigung.

Der luftgekühlte, seitengesteuerte Zweizylinder-Viertakt-V-Motor hatte einem Hubraum von 845 cm³ und eine Leistung von 15 PS (11 kW). Über die Kardanwelle und das an die Hinterachse angeflanschte Getriebe (Transaxle-Bauweise) wurde die Antriebskraft an die Hinterräder weitergeleitet. Das 580 kg schwere Fahrzeug erreichte eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit von 70 km/h. Der vorne und hinten gegabelte Zentralrohrrahmen des Wagens bestand aus gepressten Stahlprofilen.

(Wikipedia)

Posted by Georg Sander on 2012-03-25 12:45:14

Tagged: , 1936 , 1937 , Škoda , Sagitta , Prototyp , prototype , skoda , alt , antique , auto , automobil , automobile , autos , bild , bilder , car , cars , classic , classique , foto , fotos , historic , image , images , klasik , mobil , old , oldtimer , photo , photos , picture , pictures , vehicle , vintage , wallpaper , 2012 , Technoclassica , Techno , classica , Motorshow , Motor , Show , Messe , Automesse , Oldtimermesse , Essen , Germany …