Maybach DS8 Zeppelin Cabriolet Spohn Streamliner (1934)

Maybach DS8 Zeppelin Cabriolet Spohn Streamliner (1934)

Wilhelm Maybach, collaborator and friend of Gottlieb Daimler and the ingenious designer of the “Mercedes”, the first “proper” car, left Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft, where he had worked as Chief Engineer, in 1907. Together with his son, Karl, he started developing his own engines which in his opinion were excellently suited to driving the airships which had just begun cruising the skies. He approached Count Zeppelin, convinced him of the quality and performance of his engines and together they founded "Luftfahrzeug-Motorenbau GmbH“ in Bissingen near Stuttgart in 1909. Maybach’s son Karl was appointed Technical Director of this new aero engine company.
In 1912, the company – an early joint venture – moved to Friedrichshafen, to premises adjacent to Count Zeppelin’s airship factory. Until around 1920, Wilhelm Maybach intensively supported his son in his development work, bringing forth top-quality and highly progressive petrol and diesel engines as well as transmissions over several decades.

In 1921, Karl Maybach began producing his own cars in Friedrichshafen, engaging in the manufacture and assembly of frame, suspension, engine, transmission, radiator, firewall and major components. Maybach and his staff were less interested in bodywork design – this was the realm of specialist bodybuilders who tailored their designs to the customers’ wishes.

Close cooperation developed in the course of the years with the bodybuilding company of Herrmann Spohn in nearby Ravensburg; they even engaged in the manufacture of mini-series. Nevertheless, Spohn had to share the cake with other bodybuilders like Gläser in Dresden, Auer in Stuttgart and Neuss and Erdmann & Rossi in Berlin, to name but a few.

Thanks to their outstanding engineering, smooth-running engines and the quality appointments of the bodies, crafted by hand to the customers’ wishes, the exclusive Maybach cars very quickly established themselves in the world market – as limousines, voluminous Pullman versions, two-to-seven-seater coupés, cabriolets and roadsters. They were direct competitors of – and in the opinion of some contemporaries even superior to – the “Grand Mercedes”, Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Isotta-Fraschini and other luxury models.

The Maybach “Zeppelin” is one of the most famous models in the line-up of international luxury cars from the nineteen-thirties – a terrific twelve-cylinder car that was built in numerous versions between 1930 and 1937.
A contemporary test report enthused “… The Maybach Zeppelin models rank among the few cars in the international top class. They are highly luxurious, extremely lavish in their engineering and attainable only for a chosen few, not only on account of the small series in which these splendid cars are built.” (Allgemeine Automobilzeitung 1933, no. 35).
The Maybach Zeppelin DS 8, model year 1932, with chassis number 1387, and today owned by the Mercedes-Benz Museum, is one of these luxury limousines. Its completely restored bodywork, specially tailored by Messrs. Spohn in Ravensburg, is a four-door six-to-seven-seater cabriolet with long wheelbase and ample space for feeling at ease in comfortable leather chairs. Itself a feast for the eyes, the eight-litre V12 engine (number 25041) is still in a virtually “straight-from-the-factory” condition and in perfect working order. …

Elcar Motorcar

Elcar Motorcar

1928 Elcar 8-91 Roadster. Saturday I saw my first Elcar automobile. Friday I told my 91 year old mother whom I was visiting that I was going to an automobile Concourse in South Bend where they would have some old classic cars on display. She then told me that her mother worked as a secretary for a automobile maker in Elkhart, IN for a time after she graduated from high school (around 1916) and that the car maker was called Elcar Motorcar Co. I had never heard of Elcar. Ironically, the very next day I saw my first one.

The Elkhart Carriage and Harness Mfg. Co. starting in 1873 built horse drawn carriages, a Motor Buggy in 1908 and a great American Automobile called the Pratt-Elkhart (1909-1915).
The Elkhart Carriage and Harness Mfg. Co. was a phenomenal success in the early 1900s and became one of Indiana’s largest businesses by the turn of the century. The Pratt Motor Buggy reflected its roots. However, the Pratt Brothers realized in 1914 that the Pratt-Elkhart was priced too high at $2,000.00 for most people.

So in late 1915 they designed and produced the 1916 Elcar with a four cylinder engine A five passenger Elcar touring car and a two passenger "Clover Leaf" Elcar Roadster was produced for a low price of $795.00. A four passenger touring roadster was added to the 1917 line. All three models were listed at $845.00 in 1917 advertising.

When the country was gearing up for World War I, the company destroyed most of the horse drawn side of the business to make way for the building of ambulance bodies for the army in May, 1918.

At the end of World War I in 1919, automobile production resumed for The Elkhart Carriage and Motor Car Company with a carry over of the 1918 models. Like most manufacturers, Elkhart Carriage and Motor Car Company had an immediate post war boom period. 4,000 Elcar units were produced in 1919 in spite of material shortages from their suppliers. In 1920 production decreased to 2600 units due to a tightening of credit.

In 1921 William B. Pratt and George B. Pratt decided to retire from the automobile business. Their company was sold to a number of former Auburn executives and the name changed to Elcar Motor Company. 1900 automobiles were sold that year and 1300 the following year. About 2000 automobiles were sold each year from 1923 to 1929. However, the "Great Depression" changed this company like many other automobile manufacturers. By the end of 1931, The Elcar Motor Company was bankrupt and only built a few Taxi cabs from 1931 to 1933, when they closed the doors for good.

I took the photo. I got the automaker information from the following web page. www.american-automobiles.com/Elcar.html

Posted by david.horst.7 on 2018-08-13 18:25:52

Tagged: , car , auto , automobile , vehicle , classic , vintage , Elcar , roadster , 1928 …

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car front right

1947 MG TC Midget Sports Car front right

MG Cars is a former British sports car manufacturer, which was founded in 1924, the creator of the MG brand.
MG Cars is best known for its two-seat open sports cars, but MG also produced saloons and coupés. More recently, the MG marque has also been used on sportier versions of other models belonging to the parent company.
The MG marque was in continuous use (barring the years of the Second World War) for 56 years after its inception. Production of predominantly two-seater sports cars was concentrated at a factory in Abingdon, some 10 miles (16 km) south of Oxford. The British Motor Corporation (BMC) competition department was also based at the Abingdon plant and produced many winning rally and race cars. In the autumn of 1980, however, the Abingdon factory closed and MGB production ceased.
The MG TA replaced the PB in 1936. It was an evolution of the previous car and was 3 inches (76 mm) wider in its track at 45 inches and 7 inches (180 mm) longer in its wheelbase at 94 inches. The previous advanced overhead cam engine was now not in use by any other production car so it was replaced by a more typical MPJG OHV unit from the Wolseley 10 but with twin SU carburettors, modified camshaft and manifolding. The engine displaced just 1292 cc, with a stroke of 102 mm and a bore of 63.5 mm and power output was 50 hp (40.3 kW) at 4500 rpm. The four speed manual gearbox now had synchromesh on the two top ratios. Like the PB, most were two seat open cars with a steel body on an ash frame but it could also be had from 1938 as a Tickford drophead coupé with body by Salmsons of Newport Pagnell or closed "airline" coupé as fitted to the P type but only one of these is thought to have been made. It was capable of reaching nearly 80 mph (130 km/h) in standard tune with a 0-60 mph time of 23.1 seconds. Unlike the PB, hydraulic brakes were fitted. Just over 3000 were made and in 1936 it cost £222 on the home market.
The TA was replaced by the TB in May 1939 with the fitting of a smaller but more modern XPAG engine as fitted to the Morris 10 but in a higher tuned state and like the TA with twin SU carburettors. This 1250 cc I4 unit featured a slightly less-undersquare 66.6 mm bore and 90 mm stroke and had a maximum power output of 54 hp (40 kW) at 5200 rpm. Available as either an open 2 seater or more luxurious Tickford drophead coupé, this is the rarest of the T type cars with only 379 made.
On the eve of the war, MG had offered the TB model which, with a few modifications was to become the first post-war MG, the TC Midget. The chassis of the new car was essentially the same as before, but the sliding trunnion …

1934 Citroen 15cv Traction Avant 49

1934 Citroen 15cv Traction Avant 49

Citroen is a French automobile manufacturer. Founded in 1919 by André Citroën, it was the one of the world’s first mass-production car company outside of the USA.[citation needed] Since 1976 it has been part of PSA Peugeot Citroën, and its headquarters is on rue Fructidor,[citation needed] in Saint-Ouen, Seine-Saint-Denis, near Paris.[2] The brand celebrated its 90th Anniversary in 2009.
Originally a mass-market car maker with relatively straightforward designs, Citroën shocked the world in 1934 with the innovative Traction Avant, the world’s first mass-production front wheel drive car (1934–57). Other significant models include the H Van (1947–81), the 2CV (1948–90), the DS (1955–1975) and the CX (1974–91).

The Citroën Traction Avant (French pronunciation: [tʁaksjɔ̃ʔaˈvɑ̃]) was an innovative front wheel drive automobile produced by the French manufacturer Citroën. About 760,000 units were produced from 1934 to 1957.
The Traction Avant, French for "forward traction", was designed by André Lefèbvre and Flaminio Bertoni in late 1933 / early 1934. While not the first production front wheel drive car – Alvis built the 1928 FWD in the UK , Cord produced the L29 from 1929 to 1932 in the United States and DKW the F1 in 1931 in Germany – it was the world’s first front wheel drive steel monocoque production car. Along with DKWs 1930s models, the Traction successfully pioneered front wheel drive on the European mass car market.
The Traction Avant’s structure was an arc-welded monocoque (unitized body). Most other cars of the era were based on a separate frame (chassis) onto which the non-structural body ("coachwork") was built. Monocoque construction (also called Unit Body or "Unibody" in the US today) results in a lighter vehicle, and is now used for virtually all car construction, although body-on-frame construction is still suitable for larger vehicles such as trucks.
This method of construction was viewed with great suspicion in many quarters, with doubts about its strength. A type of crash test was developed, taking the form of driving the car off a cliff, to illustrate its great inherent resilience. [1]
The novel design made the car seem very low-slung relative to its contemporaries — the Traction Avant always possessed a unique look, which went from appearing rakish in 1934 to familiar and somewhat old fashioned by 1955.
The suspension was very advanced for the car’s era. The front wheels were independently sprung, using a torsion bar and wishbone suspension arrangement, where most contemporaries used live axle and cart-type leaf spring designs. The rear suspension was a simple steel beam axle and a Panhard rod, trailing arms and torsion bars attached to a 3-inch (76 mm) steel tube, which in turn was bolted to the "monocoque".
Since it was considerably lighter than "conventional" designs of the era, it was capable of 100 km/h (62 mph), and consumed gasoline / petrol only at the rate of 10 litres per 100 kilometres (28 mpg-imp; 24 mpg-US).
The original model, which was presented on 18 April 1934, was a small saloon with a 1303 cc engine. This model …