Mercedes-Benz C111 Concept

Mercedes-Benz C111 Concept

The compact wedge in bright orange, a shade internally called weissherbst, expressed power, elegance and speed. C 111 was the designation of the futuristic study displayed by Mercedes-Benz in September 1969 at the Frankfurt International Motor Show (IAA). The car broke new ground in terms of both engineering and design. Motor show visitors crowded around the sports car, marveling at its intriguing design. Was this the worthy successor to the famous 300 SL Gullwing? The car’s style, dynamic lines and classic gullwing doors promised just that to lovers of refined cars with the three-pointed star on the hood. This happened 35 years ago, at the C 111’s presentation in Frankfurt. In the spring of 1970, an even more elegantly clad C 111-II made its appearance at the Geneva Motor Show, prompting interested parties to send blank checks to Stuttgart to secure one of these cars for themselves.

Neither the C111-II or C 111 did not to appear in showrooms despite their lavish interior and cargo space. The coupes may have looked production worthy, but complex technologies embedded within in the cars kept them as experimental cars. However, the research in testing Wankel engines, new suspension components and plastic bodywork components contributed to future Mercedes-Benz road cars.

The three-rotor Wankel engine in the first C 111 of 1969 developed 206 kW/ 280 hp, giving the car a top speed of around 260 km/h. The newcomer set out on its first tests in Unterturkheim, on the Hockenheimring and the Nurburgring in April and May 1969. The suspension featured anti-squat and anti-dive control; its front axle components were incorporated in large-scale production at a later stage and the rear axle was a precursor of today’s multi-link independent rear suspension. On the basis of the experience gained in testing this car, another five experimental cars were built.

From Wankel to Diesel
An exceptional feature of the C 111 was hidden under its skin. The first experimental car of 1969 was powered not by a reciprocating-piston engine but by a Wankel – or rotary – engine. At the time, many manufacturers were interested in Felix Wankel’s unconventional propulsion system. Mercedes-Benz, too, had been experimenting with Wankel engines since 1962. However, the Wankel engine had to be extensively road-tested before being fitted in production cars.

The engines of the first two C 111 versions were straightforward gas-guzzlers. And since the pollutant content in the exhaust gas of the Wankel engines was also too high, Mercedes-Benz discontinued work on this type of engine in 1971, in spite of its impressively smooth running characteristics and compact size.The last Mercedes with a rotary-piston engine from this series was the four-rotor DB M950 KE409 of the C 111-II in 1970. Subsequent versions of the C111 project were powered by a diesel engine. They quite successfully showcased Mercedes-Benz’s prowess by breaking many world records.

[Text from Supercars.net]

Read more at www.supercars.net/cars/3015.html#YWhiHErEpHHjWgQ0.99

This Lego miniland-scale Mercedes-Benz C111 has been created for Flickr LUGNuts’ 84th build challenge, our 7th birthday, to the theme, …

Austin Metropolitan

Austin Metropolitan

1957 Austin Metropolitan at the 2011 Cromford Steam Fair.

A brief history of the Metropolitan

In 1950, the Nash Motor Corporation, one of the leading independent US auto manufacturers, decided to test public reaction to a new small car they were considering putting into production. This was a revolutionary concept in those days of big gas guzzlers.

They issued a questionnaire pamphlet called a "surview" showing pictures of a prototype concept car, based on a design by independent auto designer William Flajole, with a reply-paid envelope for people to return their opinion on the car. Quite an innovative strategy for the time.

The reaction to the surview convinced Nash that there was a market for a new small car. Since no US auto factory had the tooling or experience to build cars of this size, it was decided to produce the car in Europe. The Austin Motor Company was at that time the largest car manufacturer outside the US, and was an obvious choice, in view of their reputation for quality build and engineering.

Following various design modifications, the first Metropolitans rolled off the Longbridge production line in October 1953, and went on sale in the US in the spring of 1954. Early versions were fitted with the 1200cc Austin Somerset engines and are now easily recognisable by a "floating bar" grille, and monotone body colours for body and roof. None of these early cars were released on the home (UK) market – the entire production until 1957 was for export only.

By the time the first Metropolitans arrived in America, Nash had merged with another independent auto maker, Hudson. Metropolitans were badged as either Nashes or Hudsons, depending upon which dealer sold them.

When the Metropolitan was released on the home UK market, in 1957, it had already earned millions of vital dollars for the British car industry, and was reputed to be second only to the Volkswagen Beetle in terms of volume car imports to the States at that time. The engine had been upgraded to the proven BMC "B" series 1500cc unit used in a wide variety of other BMC cars, which had a power output of around 55bhp, giving quite a lively performance in such a light-bodied car. The car was not known as a Nash in the UK though it is sometimes wrongly referred to as such. UK-supplied cars are correctly described as Austin Metropolitans, though they join the ranks of a minute number of cars produced in the world which do not bear a manufacturer’s badge.

From 1957 on, all cars were duo-toned with white, with the main body colour ( red, green, yellow and later black) separated by a stepped stainless steel moulding. The Metropolitan was to stay in production until 1961 with only minor changes in 1959 to accommodate an opening boot lid, one-piece rear window and quarter lights in the doors.

Today the Metropolitan is a rare sight on British roads, although they continue to be plentiful in North America, the …

1955 Buick Roadmaster

1955 Buick Roadmaster

Gene Johnson Street, Austin, TX. Vintage automobile, classic car.

Posted by woody lauland on 2014-01-30 04:36:03

Tagged: , Hipstamatic , Oggl , Jane Lens , Ina’s 1982 Film , austin , texas , austex , austx , atx , tx , vintage , classic , automobile , car , GM , buick , roadmaster …

1964 Ferrari 250 Lusso

1964 Ferrari 250 Lusso

One of the rarest of the rare, the Ferrari flagship of the 1950’s and 60’s that took the world by storm, thunder, and any other meteorological metaphors you wish to insert!

Certainly a close second to the mighty Daytona’s beauty, the Ferrari 250 was once one of the world’s most desirable cars, with those crisp smooth lines and iconic engine sound echoing across both Europe and the USA.

The car was also built in a myriad of variations, 8 racing models, 2 Export/Europa models, and 14 GT models, including the Pininfarina Coupé Speciale, the Berlinetta "Tour de France" and the Spyder California SWB.

This particular version is a 250GT Lusso, manufactured between 1963 and 64. Sometimes known as the GTL, GT/L or Berlinetta Lusso, it is larger and more luxurious than the 250GT Berlinetta. The 250GT Lusso, which was not intended to compete in sports car racing, is considered to be one of the most elegant Ferraris.

Keeping in line with the Ferrari tradition of the time, the 250GT Lusso was designed by the Turinese coachbuilder Pininfarina, and bodied by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. Although the interior was more spacious than that of the 250 GT, the 250 GT Lusso remained a two-seat GT coupe, unlike the 250 GTE. The car was manufactured for only eighteen months, from early 1963 to mid 1964, and was the last model of Ferrari 250GT generation.

Auto shows often provide an opportunity for manufacturers to introduce new designs publicly. Ferrari did so at the 1962 Paris Motor Show to unveil, as a prototype, the 250 GT Lusso. The prototype was almost identical to the production version, and only minor details changed thereafter.

The new model was a way for Ferrari to fill a void left between the sporty 250GT SWB and the luxurious 250GTE 2+2, the Lusso met the new demands of the 1960s. Indeed, fans of sporting driving of the time became as fond of civilized designs, that is, comfortable and spacious, as they were of radical sports cars. Ferrari did not skimp on details in the GTL, which shows on the scales; weight ranged from 2,250 to 2,890lb, depending on equipment.

Unusually brief for a Ferrari model, GTL’s production began January 1963 and ended August 1964. According to a longstanding American expert on Ferrari, Peter Coltrin, the construction of the 250 GT Lusso must have begun soon after the presentation of the prototype of the Paris Motor Show.

Although it was not intended to compete, the 250 GT Lusso made a few appearances in several sporting events in 1964 and 1965, such as the Targa Florio and the Tour de France. The final iteration of the 250GT series, 351 copies of GT Lusso were produced before being replaced by the Ferrari 275 GTB. Originally sold for $13,375, the GTL saw sales in 2010 between $400,000 and $500,000, and 2013 values were approaching 4 times this figure.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2015-03-28 20:20:07

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , …

Fins- R- N

Fins- R- N

Belive it or not we started seeing these old cars roll in about 6:30am in downtown Phoenix during our photowalk. Lots pf great vehicles.

3 bracketed exposures via Photomatix. Post in CS5, Topaz Adjust and Aperture.

Posted by CEBImagery.com on 2011-02-06 15:35:19

Tagged: , automobile , classic , car , vintage …