Red Jaguar Mark 1: Chrome “pouncing Jaguar” statuette on front of the hood, plus badge on hood

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Chrome

The owner of this car posted a comment describing it thus (with added links to photos of what’s being described):

Hey Guys, thanks for noticing my car! 1958 MK1 3.4 Auto. I did add spoked wheels as the pressed steel rims were warped and not safe. I could not find originals and I like the spoked better. The cut away spats are in fact original to the 3.4 model, the earlier 2.4 had the full spats. I am sure the MK2 spats do not fit this car. I have the chrome for the front and rear windscreens but I think the prior owner put the wrong rubber seals so at present cannot be installed. The doors/windows are completely original and not the same as the MK2. Thank you again, she has had much suspension and breaking work and is cruising around with ease.

Pasting then from Wikipedia: Jaguar Mark 1:

• • • • •

• Manufacturer
Jaguar Cars

• Production
1955–1959
37,397 produced[1]

• Predecessor
Jaguar 1½ Litre saloon

• Successor
Jaguar Mark 2

• Body style(s)
Saloon

• Engine(s)
2483 cc XK I6
3442 cc XK I6

• Transmission(s)
4-speed manual
4-speed manual + overdrive
3-speed automatic

• Wheelbase
107.5 in (2731 mm)[2]

• Length
181 in (4597 mm)[2]

• Width
66.75 in (1695 mm)[2]

• Height
57.25 in (1454 mm)[2]

The Jaguar Mark 1 was a saloon car produced by Jaguar between 1955 and 1959. Referred to in contemporary company documentation as the Jaguar 2.4-litre and Jaguar 3.4-litre, the word "Saloon" was often added. The designation "Mark 1" was included retroactively upon its replacement by the Mark 2. The 2.4-litre was the company’s first small saloon since the demise of its 1½ Litre cars in 1949, and was an immediate success, easily outselling the larger Jaguar saloons.

Contents

• 1 History
• 2 Performance
• 3 Racing
• 4 References
• 5 Other sources
• 6 External links

History

In 1951 Jaguar relocated to their Browns Lane plant which provided not merely sufficient production capacity for their existing range, but enabled them to move into the middle weight executive sedan sector,[3] then occupied in the UK by cars such as the stately Humbers, the bulbous Standard Vanguard and the heavy Rover P4. Jaguar’s new 2.4 and 3.4 introduced a modern style and a new level of performance to this respectable company.

Although having a family resemblance to the larger Mark VII, the Mark I differed in many ways. Most importantly, it was the first Jaguar with unitary construction of body and chassis. The car’s independent front suspension featured double wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar. The front suspension subframe was mounted on the body by rubber mounts. The live rear axle was positively located by quarter elliptic leaf springs, trailing arms and a Panhard rod in a manner reminiscent of the Jaguar D-type, being a significant improvement over the other saloons and XK sports cars. The rear wheel track was some 4.5 in (114 mm) …

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Parked in front of the garage

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Parked in front of the garage

The owner of this car posted a comment describing it thus (with added links to photos of what’s being described):

Hey Guys, thanks for noticing my car! 1958 MK1 3.4 Auto. I did add spoked wheels as the pressed steel rims were warped and not safe. I could not find originals and I like the spoked better. The cut away spats are in fact original to the 3.4 model, the earlier 2.4 had the full spats. I am sure the MK2 spats do not fit this car. I have the chrome for the front and rear windscreens but I think the prior owner put the wrong rubber seals so at present cannot be installed. The doors/windows are completely original and not the same as the MK2. Thank you again, she has had much suspension and breaking work and is cruising around with ease.

Pasting then from Wikipedia: Jaguar Mark 1:

• • • • •

• Manufacturer
Jaguar Cars

• Production
1955–1959
37,397 produced[1]

• Predecessor
Jaguar 1½ Litre saloon

• Successor
Jaguar Mark 2

• Body style(s)
Saloon

• Engine(s)
2483 cc XK I6
3442 cc XK I6

• Transmission(s)
4-speed manual
4-speed manual + overdrive
3-speed automatic

• Wheelbase
107.5 in (2731 mm)[2]

• Length
181 in (4597 mm)[2]

• Width
66.75 in (1695 mm)[2]

• Height
57.25 in (1454 mm)[2]

The Jaguar Mark 1 was a saloon car produced by Jaguar between 1955 and 1959. Referred to in contemporary company documentation as the Jaguar 2.4-litre and Jaguar 3.4-litre, the word "Saloon" was often added. The designation "Mark 1" was included retroactively upon its replacement by the Mark 2. The 2.4-litre was the company’s first small saloon since the demise of its 1½ Litre cars in 1949, and was an immediate success, easily outselling the larger Jaguar saloons.

Contents

• 1 History
• 2 Performance
• 3 Racing
• 4 References
• 5 Other sources
• 6 External links

History

In 1951 Jaguar relocated to their Browns Lane plant which provided not merely sufficient production capacity for their existing range, but enabled them to move into the middle weight executive sedan sector,[3] then occupied in the UK by cars such as the stately Humbers, the bulbous Standard Vanguard and the heavy Rover P4. Jaguar’s new 2.4 and 3.4 introduced a modern style and a new level of performance to this respectable company.

Although having a family resemblance to the larger Mark VII, the Mark I differed in many ways. Most importantly, it was the first Jaguar with unitary construction of body and chassis. The car’s independent front suspension featured double wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar. The front suspension subframe was mounted on the body by rubber mounts. The live rear axle was positively located by quarter elliptic leaf springs, trailing arms and a Panhard rod in a manner reminiscent of the Jaguar D-type, being a significant improvement over the other saloons and XK sports cars. The rear wheel track was some 4.5 in (114 mm) …

Morris Fabric Minor Saloon 1929 (1749)

Morris Fabric Minor Saloon 1929 (1749)

Manufacturer: Morris Motors Limited, Cowley, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK
Type: Fabric Minor Saloon (M11282) Series 1
Production time: 1928 – 1932
Production outlet: 39,087 (including commercials)
Engine: 847cc straight-4 SOHC (by Wolseley)
Power: 20 bhp / 4.000 rpm
Drivetrain: rear wheels
Speed: 88 km/h
Curb weight: 670 kg
Wheelbase: 78 inch
Chassis: channel-section steel ladder type and ash wood frame with steel skin
Steering: Bishop cam
Gearbox: three-speed manual + reverse / non-synchromesh / floor shift
Clutch: Morris single dry plate 61/2in diam
Carburettor: SU 7/8in diam
Fuel tank: 25 liter
Electric system: Lucas 6 Volts
Ignition system: Lucas D4A, DS4 or D41 distributor and coil
Brakes front: mechanical cable 8 inch drum brakes
Brakes rear: mechanical cable 8 inch drum brakes
Suspension front: rigid axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs + single action friction dampers
Suspension rear: rigid with semi-elliptic leaf springs + single action friction dampers
Rear axle: live
Differential: spiral bevel
Wheels: 3 stud bolt-on 3.50 x 19 inch wire
Tires: 400 x 19 inch crossply
Options: safety glass (by Triplex)

Special:
– William Richard Morris (Lord Nuffield) introduced some of Henry Ford’s production line methods in Britain in 1924 and became Britains largest car facturer in the mid ‘20s.
– The Minor was introduced at the 1928 London Motor Show, Olympia, Morris’s belated riposte to the Austin Seven (1922-1939). Only this Fabric Saloon and a Tourer were available in 1928. From 1930 the other models were offered.
– Chassis and drive train have been designed by a subsidiary, “EC Wrigley & Co Limited”, a gear manufacturer in Soho, Birmingham, that Morris had bought after bankruptcy and renamed "Morris Commercial Cars".
– The engine has been largely redesigned at Wolseley (founded by Herbert Austin), a company personally owned by William Morris. Engine, clutch and gearbox mounted as a unit at four points on rubber washers.
– The engine was expensive to produce and often had to contend with oil in the generator, so that in 1931 a simpler side-valve motor was designed, which is almost the same performance: 19 bhp at 4.000 rpm. “the £100 motor-car”. Until 1932 both versions were manufactured parallel (47,231 units built).
– The Minor Series 1 was available as this two-doo Fabric Saloon, as two-door four-seater Tourer, as two-seater Sports, as four-door Family Saloon, as Sports Coupé, as 5cwt Van and as rolling chassis for various customs, like a two-door Coachbuilt Saloon and a four-door Coachbuilt Saloon.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2016-03-20 21:28:20

Tagged: , Clay , Morris Motors Limited, Cowley, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK , Morris Fabric Minor Saloon , Morris Fabric Minor Saloon (M11282) Series 1 , cm , 1929 , William Richard Morris , Lord Nuffield , British Car , RED MANIA , RED , Vianen – The Netherlands , The Netherlands , Artistic impressions , Beautiful capture , Creative Impuls , Digital Creations , Fine Gold , Hairygits Elite , LOVELY FLICKR , Masters Of Creative Photography , Photographic World , Sexy , The Pit Stop Shop , VIGILANT PHOTOGRAPHERS …

Singer 10/26 Roadster 1925 (1849)

Singer 10/26 Roadster 1925 (1849)

Manufacturer: Singer & Co Limited (Singer Motors Limited in 1936), Coventry – UK
Type: 10/26 Roadster
Engine: 1308cc straight-4
Power: 26 bhp / 3.250 rpm
Speed: 72 km/h
Production time: 1924 – 1927
Production outlet: unknown
Curb weight: 830 kg

Special:
– At the time Singer was one of the most prolific manufacturers of motorcars in the UK. By 1928 Singer was Britain’s third largest car maker after Austin and Morris.
– The 10/26 replaced the earlier Singer 10 Model and was fairly advanced for its day. It is easier to drive than many other cars of the time.
– This two-seater with dicky seat has a four-speed manual gearbox + reverse operated by gate change mechanism, a bronze Solex downdraft carburettor, a central throttle pedal, a 12-Volts electric system, odometer, oil pressure gauge, amp meter, electric starter, a 32 liter fuel tank, coil ignition system and rear wheel drive.
– The ladder-frame chassis with steel body has a 90 inch wheelbase, worm & nut steering, original cloth wiring, ROTAX (London) head lights, side lights and switch box, quarter-elliptic leaf spring front suspension, longitudinal semi-elliptic leaf spring rear suspension, standard Dunlop Cord Five Grooved 50X19” tires and mechanical drum brakes all round (1925: the first year that the Singer featured 4-wheel brakes).
– A rear luggage rack, removable side windows/curtains, side mounted spare tires and a 2-gallon "SINGER" petrol can on the running board were optional.
– Both two- and four-seater open top models (Roadster and Tourer) were available, as well as Saloon and Coupé variants.

Posted by Le Photiste on 2015-09-04 08:18:16

Tagged: , Clay , Singer & Co Limited (Singer Motors Limited in 1936), Coventry – UK , 1925 Singer 10/26 Roadster , Singer 10/26 Roadster , cs , British Car , British Convertible , Convertible , AR-50-23 , Beilen – The Netherlands , The Netherlands , Artistic impressions , Beautiful capture , Creative Impuls , Digital Creations , Fine Gold , Hairygits Elite , LOVELY FLICKR , Masters of Creative Photography , Photographic World , Roadster , The Pit Stop Shop , Wheels-Anything That Rolls , Your Best of Today , A photographers view , All types of transport , ANTICANDO!!! , Auto_Focus , BEST PEOPLE’S CHOICE , A feast for my eyes , The Machines , THE LOOK level 1 RED , Blink again , CAZADORES DE IMÁGENES , All kinds of transport , Blood sweat and gear , GEARHEADS , GREATPHOTOGRAPHERS , Cars cars and more cars , Cars cars cars , Digifoto Pro , Django’s Master , Damn cool photographers , FAIR PLAY , Friends Forever , InfiniteXposure , IQ – Image Quality , Give me 5 , Living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) , My friends pictures , PHOTOGRAPHERS , Nice as it gets , Planet Earth Transport , Planet Earth back in the day , Pro Photo , Slow ride , Showcase Images , Lovely shot , PhotoMix , Saariy’sQualityPictures , Transport of all kinds , The Red Group , Simply Because , …