567 Arnott (Automobiles) Badge

567 Arnott (Automobiles) Badge

Arnott Automobiles (1951-57)
The Arnott name had long been associated with the motor industry due to its production of superchargers.
The Arnott Automibles began with Miss Daphne Arnott, who had been a regular at Brands Hatch, and it was she who took the decision to begin production of firstly 500cc racing cars as a private venture, from 1951 based at Arnott’s Garages in Harlesden, London. Aided by George Thornton as designer Thornton had managed the family motorcycle business and later, was employed by Carburettors Ltd. working on Arnott carburettors and superchargers until the war. For the duration, he worked for De Havilland Aircraft Co. and became the General Manager of Arnott Racing Cars. The 500 F3 racers were the first cars and were driven by some notable drivers of the time including Ivor Bueb, John Brise and Dennis Taylor, in all nine F3 cars were completed.
The model achieved success both in racing as well as in breaking Class 1 records at Montlhery in 1953. A supercharged Austin A30-engined sports car was sold from 1954, and a 1,098 cc Coventry-Climax model was introduced in time for the 1955 race at Le Mans. This model employed spring damper units operated by lengthy control arm wishbones from the wheels on the opposite side.
In all the company produced around 25 cars most of which had fibreglass bodies
including the Arnott Climax sports car,

Shot at the VSCC Spring Start, Silverstone 20-21 April 2013 REF:90C-567

Posted by robertknight16 on 2014-09-08 17:27:54

Tagged: , Arnott , Automotive.Badges , Badges , British , 1950’s , Racing

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Chrome “pouncing Jaguar” statuette on front of the hood, plus badge on hood

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Chrome

The owner of this car posted a comment describing it thus (with added links to photos of what’s being described):

Hey Guys, thanks for noticing my car! 1958 MK1 3.4 Auto. I did add spoked wheels as the pressed steel rims were warped and not safe. I could not find originals and I like the spoked better. The cut away spats are in fact original to the 3.4 model, the earlier 2.4 had the full spats. I am sure the MK2 spats do not fit this car. I have the chrome for the front and rear windscreens but I think the prior owner put the wrong rubber seals so at present cannot be installed. The doors/windows are completely original and not the same as the MK2. Thank you again, she has had much suspension and breaking work and is cruising around with ease.

Pasting then from Wikipedia: Jaguar Mark 1:

• • • • •

• Manufacturer
Jaguar Cars

• Production
1955–1959
37,397 produced[1]

• Predecessor
Jaguar 1½ Litre saloon

• Successor
Jaguar Mark 2

• Body style(s)
Saloon

• Engine(s)
2483 cc XK I6
3442 cc XK I6

• Transmission(s)
4-speed manual
4-speed manual + overdrive
3-speed automatic

• Wheelbase
107.5 in (2731 mm)[2]

• Length
181 in (4597 mm)[2]

• Width
66.75 in (1695 mm)[2]

• Height
57.25 in (1454 mm)[2]

The Jaguar Mark 1 was a saloon car produced by Jaguar between 1955 and 1959. Referred to in contemporary company documentation as the Jaguar 2.4-litre and Jaguar 3.4-litre, the word "Saloon" was often added. The designation "Mark 1" was included retroactively upon its replacement by the Mark 2. The 2.4-litre was the company’s first small saloon since the demise of its 1½ Litre cars in 1949, and was an immediate success, easily outselling the larger Jaguar saloons.

Contents

• 1 History
• 2 Performance
• 3 Racing
• 4 References
• 5 Other sources
• 6 External links

History

In 1951 Jaguar relocated to their Browns Lane plant which provided not merely sufficient production capacity for their existing range, but enabled them to move into the middle weight executive sedan sector,[3] then occupied in the UK by cars such as the stately Humbers, the bulbous Standard Vanguard and the heavy Rover P4. Jaguar’s new 2.4 and 3.4 introduced a modern style and a new level of performance to this respectable company.

Although having a family resemblance to the larger Mark VII, the Mark I differed in many ways. Most importantly, it was the first Jaguar with unitary construction of body and chassis. The car’s independent front suspension featured double wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar. The front suspension subframe was mounted on the body by rubber mounts. The live rear axle was positively located by quarter elliptic leaf springs, trailing arms and a Panhard rod in a manner reminiscent of the Jaguar D-type, being a significant improvement over the other saloons and XK sports cars. The rear wheel track was some 4.5 in (114 mm) …

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Parked in front of the garage

Red Jaguar Mark 1: Parked in front of the garage

The owner of this car posted a comment describing it thus (with added links to photos of what’s being described):

Hey Guys, thanks for noticing my car! 1958 MK1 3.4 Auto. I did add spoked wheels as the pressed steel rims were warped and not safe. I could not find originals and I like the spoked better. The cut away spats are in fact original to the 3.4 model, the earlier 2.4 had the full spats. I am sure the MK2 spats do not fit this car. I have the chrome for the front and rear windscreens but I think the prior owner put the wrong rubber seals so at present cannot be installed. The doors/windows are completely original and not the same as the MK2. Thank you again, she has had much suspension and breaking work and is cruising around with ease.

Pasting then from Wikipedia: Jaguar Mark 1:

• • • • •

• Manufacturer
Jaguar Cars

• Production
1955–1959
37,397 produced[1]

• Predecessor
Jaguar 1½ Litre saloon

• Successor
Jaguar Mark 2

• Body style(s)
Saloon

• Engine(s)
2483 cc XK I6
3442 cc XK I6

• Transmission(s)
4-speed manual
4-speed manual + overdrive
3-speed automatic

• Wheelbase
107.5 in (2731 mm)[2]

• Length
181 in (4597 mm)[2]

• Width
66.75 in (1695 mm)[2]

• Height
57.25 in (1454 mm)[2]

The Jaguar Mark 1 was a saloon car produced by Jaguar between 1955 and 1959. Referred to in contemporary company documentation as the Jaguar 2.4-litre and Jaguar 3.4-litre, the word "Saloon" was often added. The designation "Mark 1" was included retroactively upon its replacement by the Mark 2. The 2.4-litre was the company’s first small saloon since the demise of its 1½ Litre cars in 1949, and was an immediate success, easily outselling the larger Jaguar saloons.

Contents

• 1 History
• 2 Performance
• 3 Racing
• 4 References
• 5 Other sources
• 6 External links

History

In 1951 Jaguar relocated to their Browns Lane plant which provided not merely sufficient production capacity for their existing range, but enabled them to move into the middle weight executive sedan sector,[3] then occupied in the UK by cars such as the stately Humbers, the bulbous Standard Vanguard and the heavy Rover P4. Jaguar’s new 2.4 and 3.4 introduced a modern style and a new level of performance to this respectable company.

Although having a family resemblance to the larger Mark VII, the Mark I differed in many ways. Most importantly, it was the first Jaguar with unitary construction of body and chassis. The car’s independent front suspension featured double wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar. The front suspension subframe was mounted on the body by rubber mounts. The live rear axle was positively located by quarter elliptic leaf springs, trailing arms and a Panhard rod in a manner reminiscent of the Jaguar D-type, being a significant improvement over the other saloons and XK sports cars. The rear wheel track was some 4.5 in (114 mm) …

60 Bentley Continental R (1991-03) Special Edition ???

60 Bentley Continental R (1991-03) Special Edition ???

This is a post 1998 car (mesh grille, but does anyone know which of the Special editions – please)

Bentley Continental R (1991-03) Engine 6750cc V8 Turbo
Registration Number VUT 70
BENTLEY SET
www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157623759855498…
The Bentley Continental R is a large, ultra exclusive, luxury coupé made by Bentley from 1991 to 2003. It was the first Bentley to feature a body not shared with a Rolls-Royce model since the S3 of 1965, the first to use the GM 4L80-E transmission, and the fastest, most expensive, and most powerful Bentley of its day. It was also the most expensive production car in the world at launch. The concept which later became the Continental R was displayed at the 1984 Geneva Motor Show
he car’s body was styled by John Heffernan and Ken Greenley, who had run the automotive design school at the Royal College of Art, together with Graham Hull, who headed up the in-house design team for Rolls Royce and Bentley. The interior was entirely Graham Hull’s work.
The Continental R also featured roof-cut door frames, to allow easier access with a subtle spoiler at the rear.
At launch the Continental R was powered by a 6.75 L Garrett-turbocharged engine from the Bentley Turbo R with an output of 325bhp mated to the new 4-speed GM 4L80-E automatic transmission and featured self levelling hydraulic suspension, ventilated disc brakes at the front, with twin calipers. Engine management via the MK-Motronic digital fuel injection with fully mapped ignition control system. At launch, top speed was 145 mph and the car was priced at £178,000.
1994 model year saw a number of revisions to the engine, including revisions to the cylinder heads courtesy of Cosworth (another company within the Vickers group, the alloy wheels were also increased to 17 inch.
1996 saw some of the most significant changes in the cars production run notably the inclusion of the liquid cooled chargecooler as standard, along with improved engine management, Zytek EMS3, which meant improvement in throttle response, improvement in fuel efficiency and digitally controlled turbo over-boost. It also meant an increase in power output, figures which Rolls Royce now officially released, for the first time, as 385 bhp The 1996 model year also saw revised 17" alloy wheels and steering wheel tilt adjustment for the first time. This was electrically adjustable and so could now be set as part of the seat and wing mirror memory positions. Electronic Traction Assistance System began to appear on the later 1996 model year cars.
For 1998 saw electronic traction assistance system and some cosmetic changes with output remaining as before. Cosmetic revisions included fitting the same front seats as fitted to the Bentley Azure, which were lifted from the BMW 8 series (trimmed by Rolls Royce), featuring an integrated seat belt. Other revisions included small mesh vents below the headlights, laser-cut mesh radiator grill as standard, revised alloy wheels and minor changes to front and rear bumpers.
Under German ownership (1999–2003), several other special editions were made …

593 Aston Martin DBR4-4 (1957:59)

593 Aston Martin DBR4-4 (1957:59)

Aston Martin DBR4 (1967:59) *2493cc S6 DOHC Production 4
Race Number: 276 Wolgang Freidrichs
ASTON MARTIN SET

www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157623759800132…

*Original engine spec.

Designed by Ted Cutting, and originally built abd tested in 1957, the DBR4 was intended to give Aston Martin the success in Formula 1 that they were enjoying in Sports Car racing.
The chassis of the DBR4 was a conventional spaceframe structure, skinned with aluminium bodywork. Beneath the skin the DBR4’s basic design was closely related to the DB3S sports car of 1956, but with its ancillary components more tightly packaged to enclose them in the smaller, single-seater body. Although some manufacturers had started to use wind-tunnel testing for racing cars, such as the Bristol 450, aerodynamics as a science was still in its infancy where road vehicles were concerned. As a result of this, although the DBR4’s bodywork appeared svelte and streamlined, the effect was ruined by the decision to mount a large air intake on the side of the bonnet, and to install a relatively tall, near-vertical windscreen.
Although the prototype was running in 1957, developement was put on hold. Towards the end of 1958, Aston boss John Wyer instructed Ted to get the GP car out from under its sheet and redesign the front suspension for the 1959 season. That was completed in six weeks and a second car, DBR4/2, was built to the same design.
The car did not make its racing debut until
The Aston Martin DBR4/250 was unveiled to the public in April 1959, and made its competition debut on 2 May in the non-Championship BRDC International Trophy race at Silverstone. Both cars performed well, but the truth was what would have been a good car in 1957 was now to heavy and oudated, against newer designs and in the face of the rear engine revolution.
At the DBR4’s World Championship debut in the 1959 Dutch Grand Prix on 31 May, Shelby and Salvadori could only manage 10th and 13th fastest in qualification, respectively. During the race both cars succumbed to engine problems in the early laps and failed to finish. Further delays and shifted priorities meant that the light green Astons only appeared at a further three races of the 1959 Formula One season. The DBR4s failed to score even a single point during this time; their best results being a pair of 6th places for Salvadori, taken at the British and Portuguese rounds. Following a second disappointing outing in the BRDC International Trophy (Trintignant was tenth and Salvadori’s engine expired on lap 4), a solitary DBR4 appeared in practice for the 1960 Dutch Grand Prix, entered for Salvadori when the DBR5 was not ready. But Aston withdrew the entries following a dispute over start money.

Aston Martin soon abandoned F1. Three of the DBR4s were converted to ‘300’ specification, with 3-litre engines for Australian owners racing to their local rules. Lex Davison had DBR4/1 first and then DBR4/4, While DBR4/2 was cut up by the works and number 3 was sold …