Mercedes-Benz C111 Concept

Mercedes-Benz C111 Concept

The compact wedge in bright orange, a shade internally called weissherbst, expressed power, elegance and speed. C 111 was the designation of the futuristic study displayed by Mercedes-Benz in September 1969 at the Frankfurt International Motor Show (IAA). The car broke new ground in terms of both engineering and design. Motor show visitors crowded around the sports car, marveling at its intriguing design. Was this the worthy successor to the famous 300 SL Gullwing? The car’s style, dynamic lines and classic gullwing doors promised just that to lovers of refined cars with the three-pointed star on the hood. This happened 35 years ago, at the C 111’s presentation in Frankfurt. In the spring of 1970, an even more elegantly clad C 111-II made its appearance at the Geneva Motor Show, prompting interested parties to send blank checks to Stuttgart to secure one of these cars for themselves.

Neither the C111-II or C 111 did not to appear in showrooms despite their lavish interior and cargo space. The coupes may have looked production worthy, but complex technologies embedded within in the cars kept them as experimental cars. However, the research in testing Wankel engines, new suspension components and plastic bodywork components contributed to future Mercedes-Benz road cars.

The three-rotor Wankel engine in the first C 111 of 1969 developed 206 kW/ 280 hp, giving the car a top speed of around 260 km/h. The newcomer set out on its first tests in Unterturkheim, on the Hockenheimring and the Nurburgring in April and May 1969. The suspension featured anti-squat and anti-dive control; its front axle components were incorporated in large-scale production at a later stage and the rear axle was a precursor of today’s multi-link independent rear suspension. On the basis of the experience gained in testing this car, another five experimental cars were built.

From Wankel to Diesel
An exceptional feature of the C 111 was hidden under its skin. The first experimental car of 1969 was powered not by a reciprocating-piston engine but by a Wankel – or rotary – engine. At the time, many manufacturers were interested in Felix Wankel’s unconventional propulsion system. Mercedes-Benz, too, had been experimenting with Wankel engines since 1962. However, the Wankel engine had to be extensively road-tested before being fitted in production cars.

The engines of the first two C 111 versions were straightforward gas-guzzlers. And since the pollutant content in the exhaust gas of the Wankel engines was also too high, Mercedes-Benz discontinued work on this type of engine in 1971, in spite of its impressively smooth running characteristics and compact size.The last Mercedes with a rotary-piston engine from this series was the four-rotor DB M950 KE409 of the C 111-II in 1970. Subsequent versions of the C111 project were powered by a diesel engine. They quite successfully showcased Mercedes-Benz’s prowess by breaking many world records.

[Text from Supercars.net]

Read more at www.supercars.net/cars/3015.html#YWhiHErEpHHjWgQ0.99

This Lego miniland-scale Mercedes-Benz C111 has been created for Flickr LUGNuts’ 84th build challenge, our 7th birthday, to the theme, …

PDG Auto Parts Sign – Side View – Campbell, Calif.

PDG Auto Parts Sign - Side View - Campbell, Calif.

Address: 566 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell, CA

Posted by hmdavid on 2017-03-17 04:03:32

Tagged: , PDG , Paul Del Grande , Auto , Parts , sign , neon , signage , Campbell , California , mid-century , design , roadside , advertising , 1960s , plastic …

Chevrolet 1965 Corvair Corsa Two-door Hardtop

Chevrolet 1965 Corvair Corsa Two-door Hardtop

Once in a while things change from the everyday and someone tries something new.

If you are on top, and things are going great, this tends not to happen. So it was with some surprise that the great General Motors, leading vehicle manufacturer of the world, with more than 30% total global market share, tried something ‘new’.

Having successfully built its huge empire, primarily in the US, by producing ever larger Body-on-Frame (BOF) full sized cars, exhibiting more chrome, more fin and more engine than the facing competition, it was a small (by US Standards), rear-engined, bath-tub shaped car named Corvair (after a Corvette-based concept from 1955), that showed that the big dog could learn a new trick.

The ‘new’ was not without precedent. In the back rooms, GM engineers were trying all sorts of interesting things, but Styling and Marketing were more than happy to fill up customer orders faster than the factory could build them. However, as the facing ‘Independent’ US manufacturers were in terminal decline during these early post war period, a new competitor was slowly gaining ground, not by copying GM’s flash and fins, but with a little, ugly, slow car from Germany. The badge said VW, but the car was known as the ‘Beetle’.

The Beetle template was straight forward: engine in the back, behind the rear axle. The engine was made of aluminium to help with the weight distribution, and featured horizontally opposed pistons to keep the engine height down. The ‘chassis’ was a simple platform, with the engine hung out the back by four bolts and a throttle cable. The bodywork, designed prior to the war under Adolph Hitler’s close watch, wore an aerodynamic profile, grilleless nose and room for four passengers. The original brief for the car was to be capable of 100 km/h on the new Autobahns, all day long, reliably and economically. Not only was the car designed to a tight, modest brief, it was also intended to put the German populace on wheels, much the way the Ford Model T had in the US 30 years earlier.

Such a modest car was not within the ‘competitive set’ for any of GM’s US product lines, but it was an irritating itch during a prosperous 1950s post-war America, and GM’s crystal-ball readers had forecast that the economy could not continue you grow in an interrupted manner, and there would be a market for a cheaper, more modest car that wore a well-known US manufacturers badge. Ford had similarly crystal-balled this scenario, and produced the cost-focused Falcon, and similarly Chrysler with the Valiant.

Of these products though, GM was the most ambitious, and reset the US-made template.

The car: Corvair.

The Legacy: Disaster!

How could it all go so wrong?

The same drivers that led to the very modest Ford Flacon found their way into the specification of the Corvair’s rear suspension. Missing the stabiliser bars of high-spec performance models, the base Corvair developed a reputation for falling off the road. The …

Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

Triumph Spitfire Mk I Roadster (1962)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be a popular aircraft, with approximately 55 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums all over the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell designed the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. However, because of its higher performance, Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved, sometimes dramatically, over the course of its life.

Mk V (Types 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Group Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the wide bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and "clipped" wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber series over Britain would be the start of a new sustained high altitude bombing offensive by the Luftwaffe, in which case development was put in hand for a pressurised version of the Spitfire, with a new version of the Merlin (the Mk VI). It would take …

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be a popular aircraft, with approximately 55 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums all over the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell designed the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. However, because of its higher performance, Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved, sometimes dramatically, over the course of its life.

Mk V (Types 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Group Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the wide bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and "clipped" wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber series over Britain would be the start of a new sustained high altitude bombing offensive by the Luftwaffe, in which case development was put in hand for a pressurised version of the Spitfire, with a new version of the Merlin (the Mk VI). It would take …