1968 – 1975 BMW 2002 E10

1968 - 1975 BMW 2002 E10

The 2002 is one of BMW’s most famous automobile models. Its popularity cemented the company’s reputation for compact sporting sedans and served as both forerunner of the BMW 3 Series and inspiration for the new 1 Series Coupe.

With its 1990 cc engine, it produced 108 bhp (81 kW; 109 PS) in the 2002, and 130 bhp (97 kW; 132 PS) in the high-performance 2002tii, offering a top speed of 185 km/h (115 mph). The 2002tii was based on the 2002ti that was never sold in the United States. Although almost exactly the same in appearance as a regular 2002, the tii had slightly wider wheels, larger front brakes, and a number of other mechanical modifications that made the car more fun and more desirable as a collector car. One result is that many of the highly desirable "tii"s appearing on eBay and sold throughout the country are fake; it is not uncommon to see tii engines installed in standard 2002s because there is a significant price difference between the two cars. The 2002ti (touring Internationale) is very rare, even more so than the 2002 turbo, as very few of these cars still survive. The 2002ti had two solex phh 40 side-draft carburettors and higher compression pistons resulting in 120 bhp (89 kW; 122 PS) and was made 68-71. The 2002ti was also very successful in racing and Hans Stuck won the Nurburgring 24-hour race in 1970, but the car also won many hill-climbs and rallies. This made the 2002 the cult car it is today. The 2002 Turbo was launched at the 1973 Frankfurt Motor Show. BMW’s, and Europe’s first production turbo, it produced 170 hp (127 kW) at 5,800 rpm, with 240 N·m (180 lb·ft) of torque.

A three-door 2002, the Touring, was also available. The Touring was not a full station wagon, resembling a modern hatchback. BMW would not offer a Touring model again until the late 1980s, with the 3 Series. A cabriolet version was produced in small numbers by Baur of Germany, which to this day as IVM Automotive, continues to convert BMWs. This version was never sold in the United States although a number were brought in by diplomatic staff, and recently they can be imported so more have come over.

(Wikipedia)

– – –

Die ursprüngliche Baureihe 114, auch als BMW-02-Serie bezeichnet, umfasst Mittelklassefahrzeuge, die BMW in den Jahren 1966 bis 1977 baute. Die BMW-02-Serie stellte die Abrundung des BMW-Programms nach unten dar. Sie wurde aus dem BMW 1600 der „Neuen Klasse“ abgeleitet, die Modelle hatten jedoch nur zwei Türen.

Es gab nur Vierzylinder-Modelle (Motortyp M10) mit den Bezeichnungen 1502, BMW 1600-2, 1602, 1600 ti, 1802 und 2002, 2002 ti, 2002 tii und BMW 2002 turbo, wobei die ersten beiden Ziffern jeweils den Hubraum angeben (außer beim 1502, der auch 1,6 Liter Hubraum hat). Die Entwicklungscodes sind Typ 114 für die Modelle 1502–1802, E6 für die touring-Modelle, E10 für den BMW 2002 inkl. ti und tii sowie E20 für den BMW 2002 turbo.…

Automotive News NADA Centennial Celebration



Share your Story: www.autonews.com/NADA100

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Brooklyn Bridge | Looking East

Brooklyn Bridge | Looking East

Information From: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooklyn_bridge

Brooklyn Bridge
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Brooklyn bridge)
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For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation).
Brooklyn Bridge

Carries Motor vehicles (cars only)
Elevated trains (until 1944)
Streetcars (until 1950)
Pedestrians, and bicycles
Crosses East River
Locale New York City (Manhattan–Brooklyn)
Maintained by New York City Department of Transportation
Designer John Augustus Roebling
Design Suspension/Cable-stay Hybrid
Total length 5,989 feet (1825 m)[1]
Width 85 feet (26 m)
Longest span 1,595 feet 6 inches (486.3 m)
Clearance below 135 feet (41 m) at mid-span
Opened May 24, 1883
Toll Free both ways
Daily traffic 123,781 (2008)[2]
Coordinates 40°42′20″N 73°59′47″W / 40.70569°N 73.99639°W / 40.70569; -73.99639 (Brooklyn Bridge)Coordinates: 40°42′20″N 73°59′47″W / 40.70569°N 73.99639°W / 40.70569; -73.99639 (Brooklyn Bridge)

Brooklyn Bridge
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
NYC Landmark

Built/Founded: 1883
Architectural style(s): Gothic
Added to NRHP: 1966[3]
Designated NHL: January 29, 1964[4]
NRHP Reference#: 75001237

The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. With a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), it was the longest suspension bridge in the world from its opening until 1903, and the first steel-wire suspension bridge.

Originally referred to as the New York and Brooklyn Bridge, it was dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge in a January 25, 1867 letter to the editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle,[5] and formally so named by the city government in 1915. Since its opening, it has become an iconic part of the New York skyline. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964[4][6][7] and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972.[8]

Contents [hide]
1 Construction
2 Pedestrian and vehicular access
2.1 Notable events
2.2 100th anniversary celebrations
2.3 125th anniversary celebrations
3 Cultural significance
4 References
5 Further reading
6 External links

[edit] Construction
The Brooklyn Bridge was initially designed by German immigrant John Augustus Roebling, who had previously designed and constructed shorter suspension bridges, such as Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct in Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, and the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge in Cincinnati, Ohio.

While conducting surveys for the bridge project, Roebling sustained a crush injury to his foot when a ferry pinned it against a piling. After amputation of his crushed toes he developed a tetanus infection which left him incapacitated and soon resulted in his death, not long after he had placed his 32 year-old son Washington Roebling in charge of the project.[9]

Washington Roebling also suffered a paralyzing injury as a result of decompression sickness shortly after the beginning of construction on January 3, 1870.[10] This condition, first called "caisson disease" by the project physician Dr. Andrew Smith, afflicted many of the workers working within the caissons.[11][12] After Roebling’s debilitating condition left him unable to physically supervise the construction firsthand, his wife Emily Warren Roebling stepped in and provided the critical written link between her husband and the engineers …

Dynamics of Nigeria’s automobile industry



The current economic realities in Nigeria has seen market share of the automobile industry dip 37.5 per cent to 250,000 vehicles from a previous 400,000. Aminu Jalal, Director General of the National Automotive Council joins CNBC Africa to discuss the dynamics impacting Nigeria’s automobile industry.

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mechanic eye

mechanic eye

bus reflection

Posted by Vasilis Amir on 2011-08-07 09:24:58

Tagged: , vasilis amir , أمير , square …