The Lemon Laws And Your Dodge 6.7L Cummins Diesel Vehicle

A number of Dodge truck owners are aggravated with frequent mechanical problems that are related to the new technology used in these vehicles. Those vehicles affected include Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins 6.7 diesel trucks for the years 2007 through 2010 and the Dodge Ram 3500 Cummins 6.7 diesel trucks for the same years. A number of product defect law firms have received requests from owners of these vehicles, asking for legal representation and assistance. The problems experienced include stalling, a check engine light that stays on, and many other issues reported by the owners of these vehicles.

Dodge RAM trucks which come equipped with the 6.7 Liter Cummins turbo diesel engine have been causing big headaches for Chrysler, because of defects and needed repairs in the model years 2007 through 2010. A frequent complaint is that the check engine light comes on without any cause and the owner ends up taking the vehicle to the dealership for repairs under the vehicle warranty. Common issues seen by dealers include transmission problems, fire hazards in the engine bay area, faulty computer controls for the engine, problems with the emission systems, and even issues with the turbo components.

There have been a number of technical service bulletins issued by Dodge due to problems with this engine control software, and also some regarding soot accumulations in the turbocharger which is excessive and may result in problems with the emissions of the vehicle. There are lemon laws in place under the product defect liability laws, and if you are the owner of a 2007-2010 Dodge Ram 2500 or Dodge Ram 3500 with Cummins diesel engine and have experienced problems with your vehicle then you may be entitled to receive cash compensation. In addition there are experienced lawyers who will take your case on a contingency basis, which means the lawyer only receives payment if you receive financial compensation.

Dodge issued a Fire Recall Alert concerning 2007 and 2008 Dodge Ram 2500 and Dodge Ram 3500 trucks with Cummins diesel engines. The company received fourteen reports of fires which started in the engine bay compartment. These fires were caused by material used for noise insulation that sagged down and came into contact the exhaust gas recirculation cooler for the diesel engine. The solution to this problem is a simple bracket installation. This recall notice covered more than one hundred thousand vehicles. Another recall for Dodge Ram 2500 and 3500 trucks equipped with a 6.7L diesel engine for model years 2007, 2008, and 2009 was issued by Chrysler due to emissions, and this was the Chrysler Emissions Recall J35 Letter. This specific problem affected the Engine Control Module, and the solution was to have this module reprogrammed at a dealer facility.

If you own one of these vehicles and have experienced any of these problems or others then you should call a lemon law attorney as soon as possible. If your vehicle experienced problems due to a product defect then you could be eligible to receive monetary …

Attorney general sues car dealerships



Attorney general sues car dealerships

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Jaguar D-Type – Forster (GB)

Jaguar D-Type - Forster (GB)

The Jaguar D-Type, like its predecessor the C-Type, was a factory-built race car. Although it shared the basic straight-6 XK engine design (initially 3.4 litres and uprated to 3.8 litres in the late fifties) with the C-Type, the majority of the car was radically different. Perhaps its most ground-breaking innovation was the introduction of a monocoque chassis, which not only introduced aircraft-style engineering to competition car design, but also an aeronautical understanding of aerodynamic efficiency. The D-Type was introduced purely for competition, but after Jaguar withdrew from racing, the company offered the remaining, unfinished chassis as the roadgoing Jaguar XKSS, by making changes to the racers: adding an extra seat, another door, a full-width windshield and primitive folding top, as concessions to practicality. However, on the evening of 12 February 1957, a fire broke out at the Browns Lane plant destroying nine of the twenty five cars that had already been completed or in semi-completion. Production is thought to have included 53 customer D-Types, 18 factory team cars, and 16 XKSS versions.
The new chassis followed aircraft engineering practice, being manufactured according to monocoque principles. The central tub, within which the driver sat, was formed from sheets of aluminium alloy. To this was attached an aluminium tubing subframe carrying the bonnet, engine, front suspension, and steering assembly. The rear suspension and final drive were mounted directly onto the monocoque itself. Fuel was carried in deformable bags inside cells within the monocoque; another aircraft innovation.[1]

The highly efficient, aerodynamic bodywork was largely the work of Malcolm Sayer, who joined Jaguar following a stint with the Bristol Aeroplane Company during the Second World War. Although he also worked on the C-Type, the limitations of the conventional separate chassis did not allow full expression of his talent. For the D-Type, Sayer insisted on a minimal frontal area. To reduce its height, Haynes and former-Bentley engineer Walter Hassan developed dry sump lubrication for the XK engine. By also canting the engine over by 8° (resulting in the trademark, off-centre bonnet bulge) the reduction in area was achieved. Care was taken to reduce drag caused by the underbody, resulting in an unusually high top speed; for the long Mulsanne Straight at Le Mans, a large vertical stabiliser was mounted behind the driver’s head for aerodynamic stability with minimum drag. For the 1955 season, factory cars were fitted with a revised, long-nose version of the bodywork, which increased top speed even further.

Mechanically, many features were shared with the outgoing C-Type. The ground-breaking disc brakes were retained, as was the XK engine. Apart from the new lubrication system, as development progressed during the D-Type’s competition life the engine was also revised. 1955 saw the introduction of larger valves, and an asymmetrical cylinder head design within which to accommodate them. The Jaguar D-Type was the second racing car to have Dunlop disk brakes. The Citroën DS, introduced a year later, was the first production car with disk brakes in Europe. The Crosley Hotshot was the first American …