The Difference Between Photorealism and Hyperrealism

“Hyperrealism is a genre of painting (and sculpture) that resembles a high resolution photograph and is a fully-fledged school of art that evolved naturally from Pop Art, which led naturally to Photorealism.

Consequently, Hyperrealism is effectively an advancement of Photorealism. However, whereas Photorealists reproduced photographs so exactly that the human eye could not distinguish between the original photograph and the resultant painting, Hyperrealists took the techniques employed much further in that they developed ways of introducing narrative, charm and emotion into their paintings – which from a distance look like photographs but which when examined more closely are clearly nothing of the sort.

The term “Hyperrealism” was primarily applied to an independent art movement and art style in the United States and Europe that has developed since the early 2000s.

It evolved from the word Hyperealisme, which was first used by Isy Brachot in 1973 as a French word meaning Photorealism. It was the title of a major catalog and exhibition at his gallery in Brussels Belgium in that year. European artists and dealers have since used the word Hyperealisme to describe painters influenced by the Photorealists”.

The Encyclopaedia Britannica defines Hyperrealism as an “American art movement that began in the 1960s, taking photography as its inspiration. Photo-realist painters created highly illusionistic images that referred not to nature but to the reproduced image. Artists… attempted to reproduce what the camera could record. Several sculptors… were also associated with this movement. Like the painters, who relied on photographs, the sculptors cast from live models and thereby achieved a simulated reality”.

While the Encyclopaedia Britannica is satisfied with placing Hyperrealism in a semi-historical context and leaving it at that, Wikipedia goes further into defining the difference between Photorealism and Hyperrealism: “Hyperrealism”, it says, “is contrasted with the literal approach found in traditional photorealist paintings of the late 20th century. Hyperrealist painters and sculptors use photographic images as a reference source from which to create a more definitive and detailed rendering, one that unlike Photorealism, often is narrative and emotive in its depictions… The photorealistic style of painting was uniquely tight, precise, and sharply mechanical with an emphasis on mundane everyday imagery, as it was an evolvement from Pop Art.

Hyperrealism, on the other hand, although photographic in essence, can often entail a softer and much more complex focus on the subject depicted, presenting it as a living tangible object. These objects and scenes in Hyperrealism paintings and sculptures are meticulously detailed to create the illusion of a new reality not seen in the original photo. That is not to say that they are surreal, as the illusion is a convincing depiction of (simulated) reality.

Textures, surfaces, lighting effects and shadows are painted to appear clearer and more distinct than the reference photo or even the actual subject itself”.

Many artists, dealers, gallery and museum curators confuse the issue because there is no static definition of Hyperrealism. Consequently, photorealist artists are often described as hyperrealists – and vice versa. The true hyperrealist, however, …

Engineering insights: Automotive industry



Automotive engineer Oliver Tomlin works for Mira Ltd, and engineering service provider to the automobile industry. Oliver recounts his journey from engineering student to professional engineering consultant. Now involved in recruiting graduate engineers himself, Oliver highlights some of the qualities that companies look for in new recruits and explains how to acquire these.

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Ferrari Dealership

Ferrari Dealership

This Ferrari dealership is the perfect place to find your dream car… as long as it is Italian, and red.

Built over the course of the last 4 years, this is by far my largest creation to date, and a perfect showcase for my 16-wide car collection as well as my passion for Ferrari. I completed a majority of the design work for the dealership building in 2012, loosely based off of the Ferrari dealership of Tampa Bay. I began collecting pieces with countless BrickLink and Pick-a-Brick orders, with a majority of the building taking place between 2013 and 2016.

The dealership building consists of 2 main sections, front and back, and is illuminated by a series of LED lights. The building is made up of approximately 23,000 pieces, the transporter adds another 5,000 pieces, and the 8 cars contribute another 8,000 pieces for an overall 36,000 Lego bricks.

See more at MOC Pages

Posted by rjl458 on 2017-05-10 04:07:55

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2M : Dans les coulisses de l’industrie automobile au Maroc



2M : Dans les coulisses de l’industrie automobile au Maroc

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1963 Hillman Imp

1963 Hillman Imp

A car who’s name lives in British motoring infamy, a small and subtle little machine that was meant to take on the Mini, but went on to kill the Scottish Motor Industry.

The Hillman Imp was meant to be the company’s great white hope, entering production in 1963 after millions of pounds of investment, including the construction of a new factory at Linwood near Glasgow.

However, Hillman were impatient to get their car into the showrooms, and although there was a huge opening ceremony at the Linwood Factory featuring an appearance by HRH Prince Philip, Hillman had cut some corners. The Prince was only shown certain parts of the factory as most areas had not been finished, and the selection of seven cars he and his entourage were driven round in were in fact the only seven cars that would work properly.

The rest of the cars being produced were tested exhaustively by drivers hired in from the local population, basically driven until the cars wouldn’t run any more, but the distances between breakdowns were very short, some being as low as 30 miles.

Nevertheless the car was produced at the Linwood factory, which employed 6,000 people from one of the most impoverished areas of Scotland. All seemed well, until the sales numbers came in, which showed the initial problems had damaged the car’s reputation and thus resulted in it never selling the the estimated numbers. This was added to by heavy industrial action carried out by the workforce, which resulted in the factory only working at a third the capacity and suffering from many stoppages.

Because of this, the Hillman brand began to suffer, and although cars such as the Avenger, the company folded in 1976, the factory being taken over by Peugeot-Talbot. The factory continued on until 1981 and quickly demolished, resulting in high unemployment that even to this day struggles to recover.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2015-04-27 15:34:53

Tagged: , car , cars , automobile , auto , bus , truck , motor , motor vehicle , saloon , estate , compact , sports , roadster , transport , road , heritage , historic , Hillman , Hillman Imp , Imp , worldcars …