Virtual Automation: Automobile Manufacturing Plant



Simulation of the processes of an automobile manufacturing plant in a virtual environment using CosmoWorlds 2.0 and Instant Player as part of the course project.

Team members:
Anuj Jhalaria
Chintan Dagli
Harsh Mepani
Kunal Patel

The automobile manufacturing plant has four different stations:
-Machine Shop
-Paint Shop
-Final Assembly Shop
-Inspection Shop and Road Test

source

Future is here…

Future is here...

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2004 Audi RSQ Concept

The Audi RSQ is a 2-door, 2-seat, mid-engine sports coupe with all-wheel drive and a 6-speed automatic transmission. As one might expect from a future car, this concept vehicle is powerful as well. The Audi RSQ has a 5.0 liter, 610 hp twin-turbo V-10 engine with 553 ft.-lb of torque. Estimated acceleration from 0 – 60 is 4.0 seconds.

For the first time ever, Audi developed a car specifically for a major Hollywood motion picture. Audi engineers created a car for ‘I, ROBOT’s’ incredible world of 2035.The resulting Audi RSQ sport coupe is a visionary interpretation of Audi’s typical design language. The most important thing was that despite its extreme character the car should still be recognized as an Audi. The cinemagoer will therefore see the new Audi front-end with the typical single-frame grille in the movie.

2015 CES Asia Press Event (13:33)

I ROBOT Movie scene with AUDI RSQ (3:06)

The RSQ includes special features suggested by movie director Alex Proyas. The mid-engined sports car operated by the story’s police department, races through the Chicago of the future not on wheels but on spheres. Its two doors are rear-hinged to the C-posts of the body and open according to the butterfly principle.

In addition to the RSQ concept car, Audi supplied further series-production cars which appear – in disguised shapes – in the movies traffic scenes. Audi also supplied the interior mock-up used for interior car scenes.

Construction

Designers, engineers, technicians and model engineers had just ten weeks to build the concept car. At the beginning of July the Audi RSQ arrived on the set in Vancouver where it was to stay for several months of shooting. Audi also supplied an outer-skin model of the car to be used in a crash scene, as well as a separate interior mock-up to shoot interior scenes.

It is 2035 in Chicago, and cars no longer travel on wheels but on spheres. ”Integrating these spheres into the car’s design was one of the greatest challenges we had to solve”, says Julian Hanig, responsible for the RSQs exterior design. The result was a two-seat, mid-engined sports car with sphere-shaped wheels running in similarly shaped wheel arches. Hanig said. ”This even enhanced the car’s sculptured character.”

It is a sculpture that appears very flat, broad and bullish on the road. The laminate glass fiber body of the RSQ is coated with lunar silver paint, which creates the so-called flop effect. That is to say: when exposed to intensive light the bluish sheen of the silver paint takes on a golden tone.

The striking shape of the angular body cutouts for the head-light modules influence the front-end appearance of the RSQ. They are combined with side air inlets. The xenon light tubes behind the clear-glass covers enhance the character of the front-end design.

Where you find the rear window on most sports coupes, an aluminium hood covers the engine in the RSQ. In plain view this cover is an oval, …

How I Leased a $60,000 Car For Only $111 a Month and Why I Think Dealer Leasing is Dumb

The rational behind leasing a car is simple; you basically rent the car for a period of time then drop it off when the lease expires without any obligation (generally if the car is clean) or further costs.

What you are doing is paying for the depreciation of the vehicle during the lease. So, if a car is new and worth $50,000 today and in 3 years it’s expected to be worth $30,000 then you as the lessee basically pay the depreciation of the car over the 3 years to the lessor and get a new car every 3 years.

Seems simple and smart, right? Wrong, I am going to show you a better way drive cars if you can raise a lump sum of money. For me it was obvious, I am in the business of raising lump sums of money to settle debt.

So a BMW M3 Cabriolet (convertible) is a gorgeous car, it’s a driver’s machine and is truly sublime. A few years ago, and after several years of very frugal living and driving cheap cars my accountant talked me into spending some money. And that was tough for him to do; after all he is the guy that told me cars are a colossal waste of money.

It was 2006 and I was looking for a 2003-4 M3. These cars were selling for $80,000+ brand new. I always buy used and private; for 3 reasons:

1) Let someone else pay the depreciation in the first couple of years

2) Dealers usually lie and just tick me off

3) You can usually negotiate a better price with private sellers.

In 2006 used M3 Cabs were selling for $50,000 – $60,000. A 2003 Imola red M3 Cab for $46,000, with low miles really caught my eye. It was cheaper then the rest and red was a rare colour on these cars; it looked stunning.

So I checked it out, drove it and was really impressed. It was my first real experience in a premium German car and I was sold hook, line and sinker.

There was a catch. It was a US car. No big deal right? Wrong, the car hadn’t sold for a reason. It scared buyers. The owner had imported it as a “salvage title” meaning it had been written off in the US. But he had paperwork (albeit dodgy looking but, I verified it) to show that in the State of New Jersey when are car is stolen and written off, and the vehicle later recovered it gets a “salvage title” because the owner was already paid out by the insurance company.

In other states a salvage title means the car was written off in an accident. Salvage titles can’t be sold in the US again. So it wasn’t in an accident like most people would normally believe and everything including the VIN checked out on the Carfax report. In fact the car was in flawless shape and found by authorities in a shipping crate …