General Motors Middle East Automotive Technician Training Center Graduate



Rhandy Calma, a graduate of General Motors Middle East Automotive Training Center in Angat, Bulacan shares his journey in becoming a competent GM Automotive Technician. After 14 weeks of training he is one of the 22 graduates who will be deployed and employed in General Motors Middle East. As Rhandy claims, he learned a lot in 3 months compared to his experience of 8 years in the same line of work. If you have the same passion like Rhandy, you can fulfill your dream for your family by stepping out of your comfort zone and try new things that will enhance your skills and build your confidence in life.

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Used cars 012

Used cars 012

Posted by GroveCityCars on 2011-08-31 17:23:00

Tagged: , Used cars …

Government Auto Auctions – Cars Under 500 Dollars?

Until recently, used car prices had been going through the roof. They started getting cheaper when gas headed toward $4 a gallon, and then when the credit crisis hit, and there were a lot of repos on the market, they got even cheaper. Now that gas is back down under $2, they’ve gone back up somewhat, but they’re still cheaper than a while back. Of course, “cheap” is a relative term, and one man’s bargain is another man’s extravagance. What if you need a car fast, and you only have five hundred bucks? I’d head for government auto auctions. Cars under 500 dollars are available there.

Now, don’t get me wrong. At government auto auctions, cars under 500 dollars aren’t a dime a dozen. They really aren’t even plentiful. But you stand a very good chance of finding one or two such bargains at any given government auction you attend. And, yes, I’m talking about cars that actually run and are street legal. Now, it’s probably going to be quite a it older than most cars on the street, but that’s no problem. If you’re really looking for a cheap car, you can forget about a late model one, anyway. Those will be snapped up by the dealers, and they’ll go for a lot more than 500 dollars.

That’s because they’re looking for cars that can be resold fast, which is late model cars in great condition. That’s why dealers attend government auto auctions. Cars under 500 dollars don’t interest them, because they’re going to be too old to have much of a market. But that doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with a 500 dollar car you pick up at one of these. It will just be older than average, and probably not in tip top shape. But you can certainly find yourself a 500 dollar car that runs if you attend a few auctions.…

Reid Bigland Speaks at 2015 Automotive News World Congress



Reid Bigland – Head of Alfa Romeo Brand, FCA – North America – discusses the future of the Alfa Romeo brand in North America, the challenges he is currently facing, fuel prices, competition in the truck market and the thrill of the SRT Hellcat engine at the 2015 Automotive News World Congress in Detroit, Michigan on January 14, 2015.

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Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB (1941)

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be a popular aircraft, with approximately 55 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums all over the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928). In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell designed the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this thin wing enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain (July–October 1940), the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. However, because of its higher performance, Spitfire units had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved, sometimes dramatically, over the course of its life.

Mk V (Types 331, 349 & 352)

Spitfire LF.Mk VB, BL479, flown by Group Captain M.W.S Robinson, station commander of RAF Northolt, August 1943. This Spitfire has the wide bladed Rotol propeller, the internal armoured windscreen and "clipped" wings.
Late in 1940, the RAF predicted that the advent of the pressurised Junkers Ju 86P bomber series over Britain would be the start of a new sustained high altitude bombing offensive by the Luftwaffe, in which case development was put in hand for a pressurised version of the Spitfire, with a new version of the Merlin (the Mk VI). It would take …